Category Archives: cannabis

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Cannabis Scientifically Proven to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease, Cancer, Epilepsy, Chronic Pain and Parkinson’s Disease Among Other Serious Medical Conditions.

Cannabis Proven to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease, Cancer and Parkinson’s Disease Among Other Serious Medical Conditions.

dr-sanjay-gupta-why-i-changed-my-mind-on-weed
Neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta was against Cannabis in a 2009 TIME magazine article. Now, he is one of the biggest advocates of the natural medicine. Image courtesy of Google Images.

This isn’t a new development. Ancient man used cannabis for pain relief, medicinal qualities and religious/spiritual rituals, among many other uses both medicinal and industrial.

Cannabis oil has been found in the mummified remains of Egyptians, ancient Chinese writings and cave drawings. For more information and timeline of Cannabis use in Human History, please click the green link:

History of Cannabis Use in Humans.

There are thousands of patient testimonials, physician testimonials and scientific articles on the health effects of Cannabis. Of course, every medicine has side effects and I would be remiss to suggest that this plant works for everyone or has no potential for abuse. Humans abuse everything from laxatives to alcohol to prescription drugs. I would also be irresponsible to suggest using Cannabis to anyone. Different states have different laws, and while 21 states have enacted medical marijuana laws, the U.S. Government still deems Cannabis a dangerous drug with NO medicinal use. The Federal Government classifies Cannabis as a Schedule 1 drug, which puts it in the same class as Heroin.

Image courtesy of www.cureyourowncancer.org
Image courtesy of http://www.cureyourowncancer.org This is a real picture of real results. Visit the website http://www.cureyourowncancer.org for more information.

This is simply an article presenting a history of the use of Cannabis in Humans throughout the centuries and also several videos of actual physician and patient testimonials. This article is intended to provide evidence and education on the anti-cancer properties of this complex plant known as Cannabis.

The following information was taken directly from http://www.cancer.gov.

Laboratory/Animal/Preclinical Studies

Anti-tumor Effects
Appetite Stimulation
Analgesia

Cannabinoids are a group of 21-carbon–containing terpenophenolic compounds produced uniquely byCannabis species (e.g., Cannabis sativa L.) .[1,2] These plant-derived compounds may be referred to as phytocannabinoids. Although delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient, other known compounds with biologic activity are cannabinol, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabichromene, cannabigerol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, and delta-8-THC. CBD, in particular, is thought to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity without the psychoactive effect (high) of delta-9-THC.

Anti-tumor Effects:

One study in mice and rats suggested that cannabinoids may have a protective effect against the development of certain types of tumors.[3] During this 2-year study, groups of mice and rats were given various doses of THC by gavage. A dose-related decrease in the incidence of hepatic adenoma tumors and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was observed in the mice. Decreased incidences of benign tumors(polyps and adenomas) in other organs (mammary glanduterus, pituitary, testis, and pancreas) were also noted in the rats. In another study, delta-9-THC, delta-8-THC, and cannabinol were found to inhibit the growth of Lewis lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo .[4] In addition, other tumors have been shown to be sensitive to cannabinoid-induced growth inhibition.[5-8]

Cannabinoids may cause anti-tumor effects by various mechanisms, including induction of cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis invasion and metastasis.[9-12] Two reviews summarize the molecular mechanisms of action of cannabinoids as anti-tumor agents.[13,14] Cannabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their non-transformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death. These compounds have been shown to induce apoptosis in gliomacells in culture and induce regression of glioma tumors in mice and rats. Cannabinoids protect normal glial cells of astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages from apoptosis mediated by the CB1 receptor.[15]

The effects of delta-9-THC and a synthetic agonist of the CB2 receptor were investigated in HCC.[16] Both agents reduced the viability of HCC cells in vitro and demonstrated anti-tumor effects in HCC subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The investigations documented that the anti-HCC effects are mediated by way of the CB2 receptor. Similar to findings in glioma cells, the cannabinoids were shown to trigger cell death through stimulation of an endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway that activates autophagy and promotes apoptosis. Other investigations have confirmed that CB1 and CB2 receptors may be potential targets in non-small cell lung carcinoma [17] and breast cancer.[18]

An in vitro study of the effect of CBD on programmed cell death in breast cancer cell lines found that CBD induced programmed cell death, independent of the CB1, CB2, or vanilloid receptors. CBD inhibited the survival of both estrogen receptor–positive and estrogen receptor–negative breast cancercell lines, inducing apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner while having little effect on non-tumorigenic, mammary cells.[19]

CBD has also been demonstrated to exert a chemopreventive effect in a mouse model of colon cancer.[20] In the experimental system, azoxymethane increased  premalignant and malignant lesions in the mouse colon. Animals treated with azoxymethane and CBD concurrently were protected from developing premalignant and malignant lesions. In in vitro experiments involving colorectal cancer cell lines, the investigators found that CBD protected DNA from oxidative damage, increased endocannabinoid levels, and reduced cell proliferation. In a subsequent study, the investigators found that the antiproliferative effect of CBD was counteracted by selective CB1 but not CB2 receptor antagonists, suggesting an involvement of CB1 receptors.[21]

Another investigation into the anti-tumor effects of CBD examined the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1).[12] ICAM-1 expression has been reported to be negatively correlated with cancermetastasis. In lung cancer cell lines, CBD upregulated ICAM-1, leading to decreased cancer cell invasiveness.

In an in vivo model using severe combined immunodeficient mice, subcutaneous tumors were generated by inoculating the animals with cells from human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines.[22] Tumor growth was inhibited by 60% in THC-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated control mice. Tumor specimens revealed that THC had antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects. However, research with immunocompetent murine tumor models has demonstrated immunosuppression and enhanced tumor growth in mice treated with THC.[23,24]

In addition, both plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids have been studied for anti-inflammatoryeffects. A mouse study demonstrated that endogenous cannabinoid system signaling is likely to provide intrinsic protection against colonic inflammation.[25] As a result, a hypothesis that phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoids may be useful in the risk reduction and treatment of colorectal cancer has been developed.[26-29]

CBD may also enhance uptake of cytotoxic drugs into malignant cells. Activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 2 (TRPV2) has been shown to inhibit proliferation of human glioblastoma multiforme cells and overcome resistance to the chemotherapy agent carmustine.[30] In an in vitro model, CBD increased TRPV2 activation and increased uptake of cytotoxic drugs, leading to apoptosis of glioma cells without affecting normal human astrocytes. This suggests that coadministration of CBD with cytotoxic agents may increase drug uptake and potentiate cell death in human glioma cells.

Many animal studies have previously demonstrated that delta-9-THC and other cannabinoids have a stimulatory effect on appetite and increase food intake. It is believed that the endogenous cannabinoid system may serve as a regulator of feeding behavior. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide potently enhances appetite in mice.[31] Moreover, CB1 receptors in the hypothalamus may be involved in the motivational or reward aspects of eating.[32]

Analgesia

Understanding the mechanism of cannabinoid-induced analgesia has been increased through the study of cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, and synthetic agonists and antagonists. The CB1 receptor is found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral nerve terminals. Similar toopioid receptors, increased levels of the CB1 receptor are found in regions of the brain that regulate nociceptive processing.[33] CB2 receptors, located predominantly in peripheral tissue, exist at very low levels in the CNS. With the development of receptor-specific antagonists, additional information about the roles of the receptors and endogenous cannabinoids in the modulation of pain has been obtained.[34,35]

Cannabinoids may also contribute to pain modulation through an anti-inflammatory mechanism; a CB2 effect with cannabinoids acting on mast cell receptors to attenuate the release of inflammatory agents, such as histamine and serotonin, and on keratinocytes to enhance the release of analgesic opioids has been described.[36-38] One study reported that the efficacy of synthetic CB1- and CB2-receptor agonists were comparable with the efficacy of morphine in a murine model of tumor pain.[39]

HELP END THE PROHIBITION OF CANNABIS! SIGN THE PETITION BELOW BY CLICKING ON THE IMAGE.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans. THE SCIENCE IS IN. THIS PLANT CURES AND PREVENTS CANCER. THIS PLANT TREATS MANY SERIOUS MEDICAL CONDITIONS. IT’S THE 21ST CENTURY. TIME FOR COMMON SENSE AND DRUG LAW REFORM.

References

  1. Adams IB, Martin BR: Cannabis: pharmacology and toxicology in animals and humans. Addiction 91 (11): 1585-614, 1996.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  2. Grotenhermen F, Russo E, eds.: Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutic Potential. Binghamton, NY: The Haworth Press, 2002.
  3.  National Toxicology Program .: NTP toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of 1-trans-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CAS No. 1972-08-3) in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice (gavage studies). Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser 446 (): 1-317, 1996.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  4. Bifulco M, Laezza C, Pisanti S, et al.: Cannabinoids and cancer: pros and cons of an antitumour strategy. Br J Pharmacol 148 (2): 123-35, 2006.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  5. Sánchez C, de Ceballos ML, Gomez del Pulgar T, et al.: Inhibition of glioma growth in vivo by selective activation of the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor. Cancer Res 61 (15): 5784-9, 2001. [PUBMED Abstract]
  6. McKallip RJ, Lombard C, Fisher M, et al.: Targeting CB2 cannabinoid receptors as a novel therapy to treat malignant lymphoblastic disease. Blood 100 (2): 627-34, 2002.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  7. Casanova ML, Blázquez C, Martínez-Palacio J, et al.: Inhibition of skin tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo by activation of cannabinoid receptors. J Clin Invest 111 (1): 43-50, 2003. [PUBMED Abstract]
  8. Blázquez C, González-Feria L, Alvarez L, et al.: Cannabinoids inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in gliomas. Cancer Res 64 (16): 5617-23, 2004.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  9. Guzmán M: Cannabinoids: potential anticancer agents. Nat Rev Cancer 3 (10): 745-55, 2003. [PUBMED Abstract]
  10. Blázquez C, Casanova ML, Planas A, et al.: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by cannabinoids. FASEB J 17 (3): 529-31, 2003.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  11. Vaccani A, Massi P, Colombo A, et al.: Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism. Br J Pharmacol 144 (8): 1032-6, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  12. Ramer R, Bublitz K, Freimuth N, et al.: Cannabidiol inhibits lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis via intercellular adhesion molecule-1. FASEB J 26 (4): 1535-48, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  13. Velasco G, Sánchez C, Guzmán M: Towards the use of cannabinoids as antitumour agents. Nat Rev Cancer 12 (6): 436-44, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  14. Cridge BJ, Rosengren RJ: Critical appraisal of the potential use of cannabinoids in cancer management. Cancer Manag Res 5: 301-13, 2013.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  15. Torres S, Lorente M, Rodríguez-Fornés F, et al.: A combined preclinical therapy of cannabinoids and temozolomide against glioma. Mol Cancer Ther 10 (1): 90-103, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  16. Vara D, Salazar M, Olea-Herrero N, et al.: Anti-tumoral action of cannabinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma: role of AMPK-dependent activation of autophagy. Cell Death Differ 18 (7): 1099-111, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  17. Preet A, Qamri Z, Nasser MW, et al.: Cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as novel targets for inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer growth and metastasis. Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4 (1): 65-75, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  18. Nasser MW, Qamri Z, Deol YS, et al.: Crosstalk between chemokine receptor CXCR4 and cannabinoid receptor CB2 in modulating breast cancer growth and invasion. PLoS One 6 (9): e23901, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  19. Shrivastava A, Kuzontkoski PM, Groopman JE, et al.: Cannabidiol induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells by coordinating the cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy. Mol Cancer Ther 10 (7): 1161-72, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  20. Aviello G, Romano B, Borrelli F, et al.: Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer. J Mol Med (Berl) 90 (8): 925-34, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  21. Romano B, Borrelli F, Pagano E, et al.: Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol. Phytomedicine 21 (5): 631-9, 2014. [PUBMED Abstract]
  22. Preet A, Ganju RK, Groopman JE: Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration in vitro as well as its growth and metastasis in vivo. Oncogene 27 (3): 339-46, 2008.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  23. Zhu LX, Sharma S, Stolina M, et al.: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits antitumor immunity by a CB2 receptor-mediated, cytokine-dependent pathway. J Immunol 165 (1): 373-80, 2000. [PUBMED Abstract]
  24. McKallip RJ, Nagarkatti M, Nagarkatti PS: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances breast cancer growth and metastasis by suppression of the antitumor immune response. J Immunol 174 (6): 3281-9, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  25. Massa F, Marsicano G, Hermann H, et al.: The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation. J Clin Invest 113 (8): 1202-9, 2004.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  26. Patsos HA, Hicks DJ, Greenhough A, et al.: Cannabinoids and cancer: potential for colorectal cancer therapy. Biochem Soc Trans 33 (Pt 4): 712-4, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  27. Liu WM, Fowler DW, Dalgleish AG: Cannabis-derived substances in cancer therapy–an emerging anti-inflammatory role for the cannabinoids. Curr Clin Pharmacol 5 (4): 281-7, 2010. [PUBMED Abstract]
  28. Malfitano AM, Ciaglia E, Gangemi G, et al.: Update on the endocannabinoid system as an anticancer target. Expert Opin Ther Targets 15 (3): 297-308, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  29. Sarfaraz S, Adhami VM, Syed DN, et al.: Cannabinoids for cancer treatment: progress and promise. Cancer Res 68 (2): 339-42, 2008.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  30. Nabissi M, Morelli MB, Santoni M, et al.: Triggering of the TRPV2 channel by cannabidiol sensitizes glioblastoma cells to cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Carcinogenesis 34 (1): 48-57, 2013.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  31. Mechoulam R, Berry EM, Avraham Y, et al.: Endocannabinoids, feeding and suckling–from our perspective. Int J Obes (Lond) 30 (Suppl 1): S24-8, 2006.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  32. Fride E, Bregman T, Kirkham TC: Endocannabinoids and food intake: newborn suckling and appetite regulation in adulthood. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 230 (4): 225-34, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  33. Walker JM, Hohmann AG, Martin WJ, et al.: The neurobiology of cannabinoid analgesia. Life Sci 65 (6-7): 665-73, 1999.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  34. Meng ID, Manning BH, Martin WJ, et al.: An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids. Nature 395 (6700): 381-3, 1998.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  35. Walker JM, Huang SM, Strangman NM, et al.: Pain modulation by release of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96 (21): 12198-203, 1999.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  36. Facci L, Dal Toso R, Romanello S, et al.: Mast cells express a peripheral cannabinoid receptor with differential sensitivity to anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92 (8): 3376-80, 1995.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  37. Ibrahim MM, Porreca F, Lai J, et al.: CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation produces antinociception by stimulating peripheral release of endogenous opioids. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102 (8): 3093-8, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  38. Richardson JD, Kilo S, Hargreaves KM: Cannabinoids reduce hyperalgesia and inflammation via interaction with peripheral CB1 receptors. Pain 75 (1): 111-9, 1998.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  39. Khasabova IA, Gielissen J, Chandiramani A, et al.: CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists promote analgesia through synergy in a murine model of tumor pain. Behav Pharmacol 22 (5-6): 607-16, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]   

http://www.canablogna.com would like to thank http://www.cancer.gov for the scientific data provided.

Article written by Emery Myers RN, DON-CLTC

This article is not a substitute for medical advice. Any decisions medically, should be discussed with your primary care physician. If you live in a state where Cannabis is illegal, then these treatment options are not available for any person legally.
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LEAP

Majority of Law Enforcement Officers Want to Reform Marijuana Laws.

by Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director

April 5, 2014

LEAP Badge Law Enforcement Against Prohibition Image Courtesy of www.guidestar.org
LEAP Badge Law Enforcement Against Prohibition Image Courtesy of http://www.guidestar.org

Our Federal and State Governments won’t listen to science, physicians, the medical field or law enforcement. It’s in our antiquated politicians hands and they simply don’t care.

survey released this week by the publication Law Officer revealed that a majority of law enforcement officers want to see our country’s marijuana laws reformed.

The poll, which questioned over 11,000 law enforcement officers regarding their opinions on drug policy, revealed that just over 64% believed our marijuana laws needed to be relaxed in some form. When asked “Do you believe possession of marijuana for personal use should…” and presented with several options, 35.68% of respondents stated that marijuana be legalized, regulated and taxed, 10.84% chose that it should be be legalized for medical reasons and with a doctor’s prescription only, 14.24% said it should continue to be illegal but only punished via fines (no incarceration), and 3.68% said marijuana should simply be decriminalized. Only 34.7% believed marijuana should continue to be illegal with the criminal penalties that are currently in place.

“This poll reveals that support for marijuana prohibition is eroding even amongst those who are serving on the front lines enforcing it,” stated NORML Communications Director Erik Altieri, “When a majority of the American people and most of those tasked with implementing a law disagree with it in principle, it is time to change that law.”

You can view the full results of this survey here.

“Prohibition cannot be enforced for the simple reason that the majority of the American people do not want it enforced and are resisting its enforcement. That being so, the orderly thing to do under our form of government is to abolish a law that cannot be enforced, a law which the people of the country do not want enforced.” – New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia on alcohol prohibition.

PLEASE SIGN OUR PETITION TO SUPPORT LEAP AND END PROHIBITION ON A MEDICINAL PLANT! CLICK THE IMAGE BELOW TO SIGN.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

- See more at: http://blog.norml.org/2014/04/05/majority-of-law-enforcement-officers-want-to-reform-marijuana-laws/#sthash.DaFZtdh7.dpuf

Article courtesy of NORML.org

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Cannabis in the Bible. Kaneh Bosm: Cannabis in the Old Testament.

Kaneh Bosm: Cannabis in the Old Testament

Cannabis: one of the oldest medicinal plants

THEN GOD SAID,
I GIVE YOU EVERY SEED-BEARING
PLANT ON THE FACE OF THE WHOLE
EARTH, AND EVERY TREE THAT
HAS FRUIT IN IT.”
GENESIS 1:29-30

Those words seem straightforward enough, and yet cannabis and most other psychoactive medicine plants are outlawed in our society. Those who use these plant gateways to other states of consciousness are jailed for doing so.

Ironically, the major force for continuing this plant prohibition is a group referred to as the Christian Right. They claim to believe in both the Bible and old Yahweh, yet Yahweh’s opinion on the matter is stated quite clearly in the above quotation.

This article shows how the Old Testament Prophets were none other than ancient shamans, and that cannabis and other entheogens played a very prominent role in ancient Hebrew culture.

THE ROOTS OF KANEH-BOSM

The first solid evidence of the Hebrew use of cannabis was established in 1936 by Sula Benet, a little known Polish etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences in Warsaw.’

The word cannabis was generally thought to be of Scythian origin, but Benet showed that it has a much earlier origin in Semitic languages like Hebrew, and that it appears several times throughout the Old Testament. Benet explained that “in the original Hebrew text of the Old Testament there are references to hemp, both as incense, which was an integral part of religious celebration, and as an intoxicant.”

Benet demonstrated that the word for cannabis is kaneh-bosm, also rendered in traditional Hebrew as kaneh or kannabus. The root kan in this construction means “reed” or “hemp”, while bosm means “aromatic”. This word appears five times in the Old Testament; in the books of Exodus, the Song of Songs, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel.

The word kaneh-bosm has been mistranslated as calamus, a common marsh plant with little monetary value that does not have the qualities or value ascribed to kaneh-bosm. The error occurred in the oldest Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint
in the third century BC, and was repeated in the many translations that followed.”

THE HIDDEN STORY

When we take a chronological look at biblical references to kaneh-bosm, we reveal more than just the story of cannabis in the Old Testament. Another exciting and concealed story emerges as well,
that of the suppression of the worship of Astarte, also called Ashera, known to the ancient Semites as the Queen of Heaven.

The First Reference to Kaneh-Bosm

MOSES & MARIJUANA

The first mention of kaneh-bosm in the Old Testament appears with the prophet-shaman Moses. At the beginning of his shamanic career, Moses discovered the angel of the Lord in flames of fire from within a bush.

It is later in his life however, that a definite reference to cannabis is made. Sula Benet explains this reference as follows:

The sacred character of hemp in biblical times is evident from Exodus 30:22-33, where Moses was instructed by God to anoint the meeting tent and all its furnishings with specially prepared oil, containing hemp.

Anointing set sacred things apart from secular. The anointment of sacred objects was an ancient tradition in Israel: holy oil was not to be used for secular purposes…

Above all, the anointing oil was used for the installation rites of all Hebrew kings and priests.

This first reference to kaneh-bosm is the only that describes it as an ointment to be applied externally. However, anointing oils made with cannabis are indeed psychoactive and have been used by such seemingly diverse groups as 19th century occultists and medieval witches.”

Closer to Moses’ own time, cannabis was used as a topical hallucinogen by the ancient worshippers of Asherah, the Queen of Heaven. Asherah has also been referred to as the Hebrew Goddess.'”

The shamanistic Ashera priestesses of pre-reformation Jerusalem mixed cannabis resins with those from myrrh, balsam, frankincense, and perfumes, and then anointed their skins with the mixture as well as burned it.'”

THEN THE LORD SAID TO MOSES, “TAKE THE FOLLOWING FINE SPICES: 500 SHEKELS OF LIQUID MYRRH, HALF AS MUCH OF FRAGRANT CINNAMON, 250 SHEKELS OF KANNABOSM, 500 SHEKELS OF CASSIA – ALL ACCORDING TO THE SANCTUARY SHEKEL – AND A HIND OF OLIVE OIL. MAKE THESE INTO MAKE THESE INTO A SACRED ANNOITING OIL, A FRAGRANT BLEND, THE WORK OF A PERFUMER. IT WILL BE THE SACRED ANNOITING OIL.

THEN USE IT TO ANOINT THE TENT OF THE MEETING, THE ARK OF THE TESTIMONY, THE TABLE AND ALL ITS ARTICLES, THE LAMPSTAND AND ITS ACCESSORIES, THE ALTAR OF INCENSE, THE ALTAR OF
BURNT OFFERING AND ALL ITS UTENSILS, AND THE BASIN WITH ITS STAND. YOU SHALL CONSECRATE THEM SO THEY WILL BE MOST HOLY, AND WHATEVER TOUCHES THEM WILL BE HOLY.

ANOINT AARON AND HIS SONS AND CONSECRATE THEM SO THEY MAY SERVE ME AS PREISTS. SAY TO THE ISRAELITES, “THIS IS TO BE MY SACRED ANOINTING OIL FOR THE GENERATIONS TO COME. DO NOT POUR IT ON MEN’S BODIES AND DO NOT MAKE ANY OIL WITH THE SAME FORMULA. IT IS SACRED, AND YOU ARE TO CONSIDER IT SACRED. WHOEVER MAKES PERFUME LIKE IT AND WHOEVER PUTS IT ON ANYONE OTHER THAN A PREIST MUST BE CUT OFF FROM HIS PEOPLE.”

EXODUS 30:22-33

Moses

THE PRIESTS OF POT

The above Old testament passage makes the sacredness of this
ointment quite clear. Moses and the Levite priesthood jealously guarded its use, and enforced this discriminatory prohibition with God’s commandment that any transgressors be ‘cut off from his people‘. This law amounted to a death sentence in the ancient world.

SMOKE IN THE TENT

Lacking the invention of pipes, it was the practice of some ancient peoples to burn cannabis and other herbs in tents, so that more smoke could be captured and inhaled. In the last installment of this column we discussed such a group, the ancient Scythians. The Scythians were a nomadic people who travelled and settled extensively throughout Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, and Russia. They burned cannabis inside small tents and inhaled the fumes for ritualistic and recreational purposes.

Moses and his priests burned incense and used the holy ointment in a portable ‘tent of meeting’, the famous Tent of the Tabernacle. As cannabis is listed directly as an incense later in the Bible, it seems likely that Moses and the Levite priesthood would have burned cannabis flowers and pollen along with the ointment and incense which God commanded them to make.

AND AARON SHALL BURN INCENSE EVERY MORNING: WHEN HE DRESSETH THE LAMPS, HE SHALL BURN INCENSE UPON IT. AND WHEN AARON LIGHTETH THE LAMPS AT EVEN, HE SHALL BURN INCENSE UPON IT, A PERPETUAL INCENSE BEFORE THE LORD THROUGHOUT YOUR GENERATIONS.

EXODUS 30:8-10

THE SCYTHIAN CONNECTION

Given that the Scythians and Israelites were involved in a trade of goods and knowledge, it is not surprising to find the similar technique of using tents to retain smoke. Benet commented on the often overlooked connections between these two groups.


The Scythians participated in both trade and wars alongside the ancient Semites for at least one millennium before Herodotus encountered them in the fifth century BC. The reason for the confusion and relative obscurity of the role played by the Scythians in world history is the fact that they were known to the Greeks as Scythians but to the Semites as Ashkenaz.

The earliest reference to the Ashkenaz people appears in the Bible in Genesis 10:3, where Ashkenaz, their progenitor, is named the son of Gomer, the great-grandson of Noah.

incense

GOD WITHIN A CLOUD

A reading of the Old Testament reveals that Yahweh “came to Moses out of the midst of the cloud” and that this cloud came from smoke produced by the burning of incense. As scholar Ralph Patai commented in his book The Hebrew Goddess, “Yahweh merely put in temporary appearances in the tent of meeting. He was a visiting deity
whose appearance in or departure from the tent was used for oracular purposes.”

One is reminded of the ancient Persian sage Zoroaster, another monotheist like Moses, who heard the voice of his god, Ahura Mazda, while in a state of shamanistic ecstasy produced by cannabis. The Greek oracle of Delphi also revealed her prophecies from behind
a veil of intoxicating smoke.

The insights achieved from the use of cannabis, whether inhaled
in the Tent of the Tabernacle or applied topically, could have been interpreted by Moses as messages from God. This is similar to modern shamans who interpret their experiences with plant hallucinogens as containing divine revelations.

CANNABIS CONCIOUSNESS

In issue #1 of CANNABIS CANADA, we discussed a book by Julian Jaynes calledThe Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind. Jaynes offers an interesting explanation of how the development of consciousness may have taken place. Although he failed to fully recognize the strong role that plant-drugs may have played in the development of consciousness,”‘ Jaynes did come up with a most revolutionary theory.

In his book, Jaynes claims that ancient people were not as fully conscious and self-aware as modern humans. Being unable to introspect, they experienced their own higher cognitive functioning as auditory hallucinations – the voices of gods, actually heard as in the Old Testament or the Iliad – which told a person what to do in circumstances of novelty or stress.

GOD SAID TO MOSES, I AM THAT I AM. THIS IS WHAT YOU ARE TO SAY TO THE ISREALITES: ‘I AM HAS SENT ME TO YOU.’

EXODUS 3:14

I AM THAT I AM

Could the commandments given by God to Moses and other Biblical prophets have been the early beginnings of full human self-awareness? Cannabis has its own unique receptor sites in the human brain, located in the areas governing higher thinking and memory. Could it be that deep interior thought grew out of language and the use of psychoactive
plants like cannabis? And that the first prototypes of this ability for deep interior thinking, an ability we now take for granted, would have been considered Prophets? Would this make God’s commandments any less sacred?

In light of this information, is not the above statement more believable as the birth words of Judaic consciousness, rather than as the commandment of an omnipotent God?

The Second Appearance of Cannabis

The next Biblical account of cannabis comes under the name kaneh and appears in relation to King Solomon. In Solomon’s Song of Songs, one of the most beautifully written pieces in the Old Testament, Solomon mentions kaneh in describing his bride.

COME WITH ME FROM LEBANON, MY BRIDE, COME WITH ME FROM LEBANON. DESCEND FROM THE CREST OF AMANA, FROM THE TOP OF SENIR, THE SUMMIT OF HERMON. . .

HOW DELIGHTFUL IS YOUR LOVE, MY SISTER, MY BRIDE! HOW MUCH MORE PLEASING IS YOUR LOVE THAN WINE, AND THE FRAGRANCE OF YOUR OINTMENT THAN ANY SPICE!. . .

THE FRAGRANCE OF YOUR GARMENTS IS LIKE THAT OF LEBANON. . .

YOUR PLANTS ARE AN ORCHARD OF POMEGRANATES WITH CHOICE FRUITS, WITH HENNA AND NARD, NARD AND SAFFRON, KANEH AND CINNAMON, WITH EVERY KIND OF INCENSE TREE.

SONG OF SONGS 4:8-14

THE GARDEN OF THE GODDESS

The ancients worshiped the Goddess as a nude female image, the earth they lived on and the nature around them. The fertile rays of the sun on the earth was thought of as God’s fertilization of the Great Mother. In light of this symbolism, it is not surprising to find
Solomon’s Song to be full of both erotic and vegetative imagery.””

In The Woman’s Book of Myths and Secrets, Feminist Scholar Barbara Walker explains

the Old Testament ‘Ashera’ is translated ‘grove’, without any explanation that the sacred grove represented the Goddess’ genital center, birthplace of all things. In the matriarchal period, Hebrews worshiped the Goddess in groves (1 Kings 14:23), later cut down by patriarchal reformers who burned the bones of Ashera’s priests on their own altars (2 Chronicles 24:4-5).

SOLOMON AND
AND THE QUEEN OF HEAVEN

In The Temple and the Lodge by Baigent and Leigh, the authors state that Solomon’s ‘Song of Songs’ is a hymn and invocation to the Phoenician mother goddess Astarte. Astarte was known as “Queen of Heaven”, “Star of the Sea” and “Stella Marris”.

The authors show us that Astarte was conventionally worshiped on mountains and hilltops, and then point to a quote from I Kings 3:3.

SOLOMON LOVED YAHWEH; HE FOLLOWED THE PRECEPTS OF DAVID HIS FATHER,EXCEPT THAT HE OFFERED SACRIFICE AND INCENSE ON THE HIGH PLACES.

I Kings 11:4-5 offers an even more explicit example of Solomon’s ties to Astarte.

WHEN SOLOMON GREW OLD HIS WIVES SWAYED HIS HEART TO OTHER GODS; AND HIS HEART WAS NOT WHOLLY WITH YAHWEH HIS GOD AS HIS FATHER DAVID’S HAD BEEN. SOLOMON BECAME A FOLLOWER OF
ASTARTE, THE GODDESS OF THE SIDONIANS.

THE SPIRIT OF THE SCYTHIANS

Solomon’s practice of burning incense on high to the Queen of Heaven may have been a custom done in the same spirit as that of the Scythians, who burned cannabis in mountain caves and consecrated the act to their version of the Great Goddess, Tabiti-Hestia.””

Archeological finds show that the worship of the old Canaanite gods was an integral part of the religion of the Hebrews, through to the very end of Hebrew monarchy. The worship of the Goddess played a much more important role in this popular religion than that of the gods.

The Third Reference
to Cannabis

GOD WANTS HERB

The next direct reference to kaneh-bosm appears in Isaiah, where God is reprimanding the Israelites for, among other things, not supplying him with his due of the Holy Herb.

YOU HAVE NOT BROUGHT ANY KANEH FOR ME, OR LAVISHED ON ME THE FAT OF YOUR SACRIFICES. BUT YOU HAVE BURDENED ME WITH YOUR SINS AND WEARIED ME WITH YOUR OFFENCES.

ISAIAH 43:23-24

A HOUSEFUL OF SMOKE

An excerpt from earlier in Isaiah indicates that God’s appetite had previously been appeased, and “the house was filled with smoke…”

AND THE POSTS OF THE DOOR MOVED AT THE VOICE OF HIM THAT CRIED, AND THE HOUSE WAS FILLED WITH SMOKE

THEN SAID I, WOE IS ME, FOR I AM UNDONEL BECAUSE I AM A MAN OF UNCLEAN LIPS, AND I DWELL IN THE MIDST OF A PEOPLE OF UNCLEAN LIPS; FOR MINE EYES HAVE SEEN THE KING, THE LORD OF HOSTS.

THEN FLEW ONE OF THE SERAPHIMS UNTO ME, HAVING A LIVE COAL IN HIS HAND, WHICH HE HAD TAKEN WITH THE TONGS FROM OFF THE ALTAR,

AND HE LAID IT UPON MY MOUTH AND SAID, LO, THIS HATH TOUCHED THY LIPS; AND THYNE INIQUITY IS TAKEN AWAY, AND THY SIN PURGED.

ISAIAH 6:4-7

EATING ANGELS

In The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross, Scholar John M. Allegro points out that ancient peoples believed psychoactive plants to be living gateways to other realms, and thought of them as angels. The Greek and Hebrew equivalent of the word angel literally means messenger or worker of miracles.

SHAMANS IN DISGUISE

It seems much more believable that the winged beings which appeared to Isaiah and other Biblical prophets were not actual angels,”‘ but rather ancient shamans, wearing elaborate costumes and enacting trance inducing rituals, all enhanced by the use of cannabis smoke and psychotropic compounds like anamita muscaria, mandrake, and others.

This type of ritual initiation was common in the ancient middle east, and often involved the use of winged costumes and masks like those the early European explorers would find the aboriginal peoples of the world still using thousands of years later.

DRINKING IN THE HOLY SMOKE

Those of us familiar with hashish know that it burns in a similar way to both incense and coal. It isn’t hard to imagine an ancient shaman lifting a burning coal of hashish or pressed bud to the lips of the ancient prophet Isaiah.

Isaiah, upon having the coal lifted to his lips, had his iniquity taken away and his sins purged. This is comparable to the way in which the Hindu sadhus lift their chillums to their third eye and exclaim
“Boom Shiva,” an act indicating their loss of ego and oneness with Shiva.

The Fourth
Reference to
Cannabis

KANEH FROM A DISTANT LAND

The fourth appearance of cannabis in the Old Testament is in Jeremiah, by which time it seems that Yahweh’s taste for the herb had declined. In the same way that God rejected Cain’s offering of grain in favour of Abel’s blood sacrifice, the cannabis also is rejected.

What do I care about incense from Sheba or kaneh from a distant land? Your burnt offerings are not acceptable; your sacrifices do not please me.?
Jeremiah 6:20

The Final Reference to Cannabis

TRADING WITH TYRE

The final Biblical reference to kaneh appears in Ezekiel 27, in a passage called A Lament for Tyre. The kingdom of Tyre had fallen into disfavor with Yahweh, and cannabis appears as just one of many of the wares received by Tyre, themerchant of peoples on many coasts.

Both of these passages refer obliquely back to the story of King Solomon. The mention of Sheba brings to mind Solomon’s love affair with the Queen of Sheba, and the King of Tyre played a pivotal role in Solomon’s building of the temple.

DANITES AND GREEKS FROM UZAL BOUGHT YOUR MERCHANDISE; THEY EXCHANGED WROUGHT IRON, CASSIA AND KANEH FOR YOUR WARES.

EZEKIEL 27:19

FROM FAVOUR TO DISFAVOUR

Of these five references to kaneh and kaneh-bosm, the first three have cannabis appear in Yahweh’s favour, the fourth definitely in his disfavour, and the fifth on a list from a kingdom that had fallen from grace in the eyes of the Israelite God. One might wonder at the reason for these apparent contradictions, and the answer can be found within the story of the suppression of the cult of Ashera, or Astarte, the ancient Queen of Heaven.

In The Chalice and the Blade, Riane Eisler explains this as follows:

There are of course some allusions to this in the Bible itself. The prophets Ezra, Hosea, Nehemiah, and Jeremiah constantly rail against the “abomination” of worshipping other gods. They are particularly outraged at those who still worship the “Queen of Heaven”. And their greatest wrath is against the “unfaithfulness of the daughters of Jerusalem,” who were understandably “backsliding” to beliefs in which all temporal and spiritual authority was not monopolized by men. But other than such occasional, and always pejorati ve, passages, there is no hint that there ever was – or could be – a deity that is not male.

The ties between cannabis and the Queen of Heaven are probably most
apparent in Jeremiah 44, where the ancient patriarch seems to be concerned by the people’s continuing worship of the Queen of Heaven, especially by the burning of incense in her honour.

Keep in mind the documented use of cannabis by the shamanistic Ashera priestesses of pre-reformation Jerusalem, who anointed their skins with cannabis mixtures as well as burning it as incense.

THUS SAITH THE LORD OF HOSTS, THE
GOD OF ISRAEL; YE HAVE SEEN ALL THE EVIL THAT I HAVE BROUGHT UPON JERUSALEM, AND UPON ALL THE CITIES OF JUDAH; AND BEHOLD, THIS DAY THEY ARE A DESOLATION. . .

BECAUSE OF THEIR WICKEDNESS WHICH
THEY HAVE COMMITTED TO PROVOKE ME TO ANGER, IN THAT THEY WANTED TO BURN
INCENSE, AND TO SERVE OTHER GODS. . .

THEREFORE NOW. . . WHEREFORE COMMIT YE THIS GREAT EVIL AGAINST YOUR SOULS. . . IN THAT YE PROVOKE ME TO WRATH WITH THE WORKS OF YOUR HANDS, BURNING INCENSE UNTO OTHER GODS IN THE LAND OF EGYPT?

THEN ALL THE MEN WHICH KNEW THAT
THEIR WIVES HAD BURNED INCENSE UNTO OTHER GODS, AND ALL THE WOMEN THAT
STOOD BY, A GREAT MULTITUDE, EVEN ALL THE PEOPLE THAT DWELT IN THE LAND
OF EGYPT, ANSWERED JEREMIAH, SAYING,

AS FOR THE WORD THAT THOU HAST SPOKEN UNTO US IN THE NAME OF THE LORD, WE WILL NOT HEARKEN UNTO THEE.

BUT WE WILL CERTAINLY DO WHATSOEVER THING GOETH FORTH OUT OF OUR OWN MOUTH, TO BURN INCENSE UNTO THE QUEEN OF HEAVEN, AND TO POUR DRINK OFFERINGS UNTO HER, AS WE HAVE DONE. WE, AND OUR FATHERS, OUR KINGS, AND OUR PRINCES, IN THE CITY OF JUDAH, AND IN THE STREETS OF JERUSALEM: FOR THEN WE HAD PLENTY OF VICTUALS, AND WERE WELL, AND SAW NO EVIL.

JEREMIAH 44:15-23

  

BIBLICAL PROHIBITION

Jeremiah’s reference to the previous kings and princes that burned incense to the Queen of Heaven can be seen as referring to King Solomon, his son Rehoboam, and other Biblical kings and prophets.

Other key Biblical figures in the prohibition of cannabis use and the worship of the Queen of Heaven include King Hezekiah and his great-grandson Josiah.

II Kings 18:4 reports of Hezekiah that:

HE REMOVED THE HIGH PLACES, AND BRAKE THE IMAGES, AND CUT DOWN THE ASHERAS, AND BRAKE INTO PIECES THE BRAZEN SERPENT THAT MOSES HAD MADE; FOR UNTO THOSE DAYS THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL DID BURN INCENSE TO IT:

AND HE CALLED IT NEHUSHTAN.

BREAKING THE SERPENT

The interesting thing about this passage is that the Ark of the covenant does not contain the ten commandments of the law of Moses, rather it holds Nehushtan, a brass serpent. The serpent is a frequent component in early representations of the goddess.

The Bible reports that the kings before Hezekiah “set up images
and groves in every high hill, and under every green tree; And there they burnt incense in all the high places…”(1Kings 17) So did the kings who reigned after Josiah, who was killed in battle in 609 BC. According to The Columbia History of the World, Josiah’s defeat seems to have been taken as proof of the error of his ways… the later prophecies of Jeremiah and Ezekiel show polytheism back in practice.”

A FORGED BOOK OF LAW

The Book of the Law, which makes up most of Deuteronomy and Leviticus, was used to prohibit the worship of the Goddess and instill the death penalty for the burning of incense. Although it was supposedly written by Moses, it was not discovered until some 600 years after Moses’ death.

In Green Gold, Judy Osburn follows the suggestion that the Book of the Law may have been a forgery committed by the Hebrew priesthood with the hope of eradicating the competing temples and their deities, which were getting more sacrifices from the people than was the temple of Yahweh.

Osburn quotes Occidental Mythology by theologian Joseph Campbell, as stating that, before the discovery of the Book of the Law,

neither kings nor people had paid attention whatsoever to the law
of Moses which, indeed, they had not even known. They had been devoted
to the normal deities of the nuclear Near east, with all the usual cults…

Up until that time the Hebrew people worshiped in the old ways, practicing their cult in open places on peaks and hills and mountains, and even caves below.

The mysterious discovery of the Book of the Law took place during the reign of King Josiah. Once informed of the new regulations, Josiah’s wrath against the incense burners was far harsher than that of his great-grandfather Hezekiah. The Bible describes his actions as follows.

AND THE KING COMMANDED HILKIAH THE HIGH PREIST. . . TO BRING FORTH OUT OF THE TEMPLE OF THE LORD ALL THE VESSELS THAT WERE MADE FOR BAAL AND FOR ASHERAH, AND FOR ALL THE HOST OF HEAVEN: AND HE BIRNED THEM OUTSIDE JERUSALEM IN THE FIELDS OF KIDRON. . .

AND HE PUT DOWN THE IDOLATROUS PRIESTS, WHOM THE KINGS OF JUDAH HAD ORDAINED TO BURN INCENSE IN THE HIGH PLACES IN THE CITIES OF JUDAH, AND IN THE PLACES ROUND ABOUT JERUSALEM; THEM ALSO THAT BURNED INCENSE UNTO BAAL, TO THE SUN, AND TO THE MOON, AND TO THE PLANETS, AND TO ALL THE HOST OF HEAVEN.

AND HE BROUGHT OUT THE ASHERAH FROM THE HOUSE OF THE LORD, OUTSIDE JERUSALEM. . . AND BURNED IT AT THE BROOK KIDRON, AND STAMPED IT SMALL TO POWDER. . . AND HE BROUGHT ALL THE PRIESTS OUT OF THE CITIES OF JERUSALEM, AND DEFILED THE HIGH PLACES WHERE THE PRIESTS HAD BURNED INCENSE. . .

AND THE HIGH PLACES THAT WERE BEFORE JERUSALEM. . . WHICH SOLOMON THE KING OF ISRAEL HAD BUILDED FOR ASHTORETH THE ABOMINATION OF THE ZIDONIANS. . . DID THE KING DEFILE. AND HE BRAKE IN PIECES THE IMAGES, AND CUT DOWN THE GROVES, AND FILLED THEIR PLACES WITH THE BONES OF MEN.

AND HE SLEW ALL THE PRIESTS OF THE HIGH PLACES THAT WERE UPON THE ALTARS, AND BURNED MEN’S BONES UPON THEM, AND RETURNED TO JERUSALEM. . .

AND LIKE UNTO HIM WAS THERE NO KING BEFORE HIM, THAT TURNED TO THE LORD WITH ALL HIS HEART, AND WITH ALL HIS SOUL, AND WITH ALL HIS MIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE LAW OF MOSESL NEITHER AFTER HIM AROSE THERE ANY LIKE HIM.

2 KINGS 23

 

SEPERATION FROM THE SHEKINAH

The Goddess returned to the Hebrew faith somewhat later in a form of
Jewish mysticism called the Cabala. This teaches that the Shekinah is the female soul of God, who couldn’t be perfect until he was reunited with her. Cabalists believed that it was God’s loss of his Shekinah that brought about all evils. In some traditions the Shekinah is seen as the pillar of smoke that guided the wandering nation of Israel during its Exodus from Egypt.

THE RETURN OF THE GODDESS

Our separation from the ancient Goddess and the denial of her ecstasies could well be seen as the root cause of humanity’s separation from nature, both our own and that of the world around us. Perhaps the Goddess’ ancient spirit won’t fully be restored until her children begin to respect and heal her abused body the Earth, return to her sacred groves in dance and worship, and are free to once again burn the holy incense of kaneh-bosm in her honor and praise.

It would seem that the spirit of Ashera’s ancient incense burners has returned, in the form of the modern-day smoke-in. Once again people of all ages, races, and creeds are gathering together illegally, to celebrate the many benefits and uses of the sacred tree, and to burn holy incense in protest, as did the defiant crowd before Jeremiah so long ago.

CANNABIS AND THE CHRIST?

But what of the Bible’s new Testament? Was Jesus a secret imbiber of
the herb, or did he continue on with the harsh prohibition of cannabis,
instituted with the zeal of Hezekiah, Josiah and Jeremiah? For the answer to those questions, you’ll have to order a copy of Green Gold, or wait for a distant installment of When Smoke gets in my I.

BOOM SHIVA! BOOM SHAKTI!
HARI HARI GUNJA!

  


BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Chalice and the Blade by Riane Eisler;
Harper Row; 1987.

Early Diffusions and Folk Uses of Hemp by Sula Benet;
Reprinted in Cannabis and Culture edited by Vera Rubin; Mouton; 1975.

Flesh of the Gods edited by P T Furst; Praeger; 1972.

Green Gold the Tree of Life; Marijuana in Magic and Religion by Chris Bennet, Judy Osburne,

& Lynn Osburne; Access Unlimited; 1995.

The Hebrew Goddess by Raphael Patai; Avon Books; 1967.

Marihuana: The First Twelve Thousand Years by
Ernest Abel; Plenum Press; 1980.

Marijuana and the Bible edited by Jeff Brown; The Ethiopian Zion Coptic Church; 1981.

Occidental Mythology by Joseph Campbell; Penguin Books; 1982.

The Origins of Consciousness in the
Break down of the Bicameral Mind
 by Julian Jaynes; Houghton Mifflin Company;
1976.

The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross by John M. Allegro; Double day;
1969.

Techniques of High Magic, by King and Skinner; Destiny Books; 1976.

The Temple and the Lodge by Baignet and Leigh; Corgy Books; 1989.

The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets by Barbara G. Walker;
Harper Collins; 1983.


ENDNOTES

1 In 1903, British physician Dr. C. Creighton
wrote Indications of the Hashish Vice in the Old Testament, in which he
concluded that several references to cannabis can be found in the Old Testament.
Examples are the “honeycomb” referred to in the Song of Solomon,
5:1, and the “honeywood” in I Samuel 14: 25-45. Creighton
also suggested that Saul’s madness, Jonathan’s and Samson’s
strength, and the first chapter of Ezekiel are all to be explained by the
use of cannabis. (back)

2 All quotations from Sula Benet in this article are taken
from Early Diffusions and Folk Uses of Hemp, reprinted in Cannabis and
Culture
, Vera Rubin, Ed. (back)

3 At this same point in history, 300 BC, a group
which would become known as the Gnostics was formed. The Gnostics (meaning
knowledge) were a symbiosis of Judaic, Zoroastrian and Neo-Platonic thought,
and claimed direct knowledge of the divine.

The Sufis, a group that is
said to be an offshoot of Gnostic knowledge, use a similar term for cannabis:
khaneh. (back)

4 In Techniques of High Magic, authors King and Skinner list the
following astral projection ointment from the 1890’s: lanolin -
5 ounces; hashish – 1 ounce; hemp flowers – 1 handful; poppy flowers
– 1 handful; hellebore – 1/2 handful. In 1615, Italian physician
and demonologist Giovanni De Ninault listed hemp as the main ingredient
in the ointments and unguents used by the “Devil’s followers”. (back)

5 As in Raphael Patai’s The Hebrew Goddess, published by Avon Books
in 1967. (Quoted in The Once and Future Goddess, by Elinor W Gadon, Harper

& Row, 1989.) (back)

6 William A.Emboden Jr., Ritual Use of Cannabis Sativa
L.: A Historic-Ethnographic Survey
, printed in Flesh of the Gods, edited
by P.T.Furst, published by Praeger in 1972. (back)

7 An idea which is fully explored
in Terence McKenna’s Food of the Gods, published by Bantam in 1992. (back)

8 For more information on Bible erotica see The X-Rated Bible; An Irrevent
Survey of Sex in the Scriptures
, by Ben Edward Akerley. (back)

9 For more information
on the Scythian use of cannabis see the second installment of this series
in Cannabis Canada number 2(back)

10 Wings on gods or angels can be seen as
symbolizing the ability to travel between the ‘two worlds’.
For example, the Greek god Hermes, who’s winged feet enabled him
to act as messenger between men and gods.

An old article but a good article on religion and the history of cannabis in Christianity. The original article can be found HERE. Click Here for Original Article Written By Chris Bennet.

Marijuana-Prohibition-Chart

Oregon Congressman Blumenauer, 17 Members of Congress send letter asking Obama to Reschedule Marijuana

Congressman Blumenauer is right on point. Watch this video. About half-way into the video, he makes REAL sense that America needs!

Washington, DC – Today, Congressman Earl Blumenauer (OR-03) along with 17 other members of Congress, sent a bipartisan letter to President Obama asking him to direct Attorney General Eric Holder to reschedule marijuana from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, as is permitted by 21 U.S.C. § 811.

“You said that you don’t believe marijuana is any more dangerous than alcohol: a fully legalized substance, and believe it to be less dangerous ‘in terms of its impact on the individual consumer,’” the letter reads. “This is true. Marijuana, however, remains listed in the federal Controlled Substances Act at Schedule I, the strictest classification, along with heroin and LSD. This is a higher listing than cocaine and methamphetamine, Schedule II substances that you gave as examples of harder drugs. This makes no sense.”

If a drug is listed under Schedule I, it means that the federal government recognizes no medical use. Including marijuana in this classification disregards both medical evidence and the laws of nearly half of the states that have legalized it for medical purposes. A Schedule I or II classification also means that marijuana businesses in states where adult or medical use are legal cannot deduct business expenses from their taxes or take tax credits due to Section 280E of the federal tax code.

“Cocaine and methamphetamine are more dangerous than marijuana. Everyone knows this,” said Blumenauer. “Tobacco, which is a legal substance, kills an estimated 443,000 people a year, while there are no recorded examples of marijuana overdoses. The Administration needs recognize the relative dangers of these drugs if it wants to restore its credibility. The first step is to reschedule marijuana, which the Administration can do unilaterally. We can’t let this arbitrary and incorrect bureaucratic classification ruin any more lives.”

The signatories on the letter along with Congressman Blumenauer are Representatives Steve Cohen (TN-09), Sam Farr (CA-20), Raúl M. Grijalva (AZ-03), Mike Honda (CA-17), Jared Huffman (CA-02), Barbara Lee (CA-13), Zoe Lofgren (CA-19), Alan Lowenthal (CA-47), James P. McGovern (MA-02), James P. Moran (VA-08), Beto O’Rourke (TX-16), Jared Polis (CO-02), Mike Quigley (IL-05), Dana Rohrabacher (CA-48), Jan Schakowsky (IL-09), Eric Swalwell (CA-15), and Peter Welch (VT-At Large).

PLEASE SIGN OUR PETITION TO REFORM AMERICA’s FAILED DRUG POLICY and the racist war on drugs!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

Original article at: Congressman Blumenauer

 

news-medical-marijuana-2

Physician and Licensed Nurse Driven Health Organizations Supporting Immediate Legal Access to Medical Marijuana.

news-medical-marijuana-2

Health Organizations Supporting Immediate Legal Access to Medical Marijuana. 21 states plus Washington D.C. have enacted medical marijuana bills to date.

April 27,2014

Below is a list of some of the most prestigious health organizations and their endorsements for medical marijuana. Why doesn’t the U.S. Government listen to the majority and to the specialists; The doctors, nurses, scientists and patients.

AIDS Action Council AIDS Action Council “AIDS Action Council supports the elimination of federal restrictions that bar doctors from prescribing marijuana for medical use by individuals with HIV/AIDS. … AIDS Action Council supports reopening the U.S. Public Health Service’s Investigational New Drug Compassionate Access program to provide access to medical-use marijuana for greater numbers of qualified patients.  Reference: “Resolution in Support of Access to Medical-Use Marijuana,” adopted by the Public Policy Committee of AIDS Action Council: November 15, 1996

AIDS Treatment News “The scientific case for medical [marijuana] use keeps growing stronger. Far more dangerous psychoactive drugs, like morphine, are successfully allowed in medical use. Somehow marijuana has become a symbolic or political hard line to be maintained by anti-drug believers regardless of human cost. The costs will mount until the public can organize itself to insist that those who urgently need this medicine can obtain and use it legally.” Reference: AIDS Treatment News, #287, January 23, 1998

Alaska Nurses Association “The Alaska Nurses Association supports the passage of Ballot Measure #8 [which] … allow[s] patients to use marijuana as a medicine if they have a debilitating disease and an authorization from their doctor.”  Reference: ANA Resolution: September 1998

American Academy of Family Physicians “The American Academy of Family Physicians [supports] the use of marijuana … under medical supervision and control for specific medical indications.”  Reference: 1996-1997 AAFP Reference Manual – Selected Policies on Health Issues

American Medical Student Association “The American Medical Student Association strongly urges the United States Government … to meet the treatment needs of currently ill Americans by restoring the Compassionate IND program for medical marijuana, and … reschedul[ing] marijuana to Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act, and … end[ing] the medical prohibition against marijuana.”  Reference: AMSA House of Delegates Resolution #12 : adopted March 1993

American Nurses Association “The American Nurses Association will:… Support the right of patients to have safe access to therapeutic marijuana/cannabis under appropriate prescriber supervision. Support the ability of health care providers to discuss and/or recommend the medicinal use of marijuana without the threat of intimidation or penalization. Support legislation to remove criminal penalties including arrest and imprisonment for bona fide patients and prescribers of therapeutic marijuana/cannabis. ” Reference: ANA Resolution: June 2003

American Osteopathic Association “The AOA supports well-controlled clinical studies on the use of marijuana and related cannabinoids for patients who have significant medical conditions for which current evidence suggests possible efficacy…” Reference: AOA Resolution: July 2011

American Preventive Medical Association “Marijuana should be available for appropriate medicinal purposes, when such use is in accordance with state law, and that physicians who recommend and prescribe marijuana for medicinal purposes in states where such use is legal, should not be censured, harassed, prosecuted or otherwise penalized by the federal government.”  Reference: “Medicinal Use of Marijuana” policy statement: December 8, 1997

American Public Health Association
“[The APHA] encourages research of the therapeutic properties of various cannabinoids and combinations of cannabinoids, and … urges the Administration and Congress to move expeditiously to make cannabis available as a legal medicine.”  Reference: Resolution #9513: “Access to Therapeutic Marijuana/Cannabis:” adopted November 1995

Arthritis Research Campaign (United Kingdom) “We think people who use cannabis to the pain of arthritis should be able to do so.” Reference: ARC Statement to BBC News: October 23, 2001

Australian Medical Association (NSW) Limited “The AMA (NSW) … encourage[s] the … Carr Government to introduce exemptions to current cannabis laws, which would allow the use of the currently prohibited drug, in specific medical cases to alleviate patient suffering and facilitate research.” Reference: Press release (“New Cannabis Exemption Laws Needed for Medical Use”) of the AMA (NSW) Limited: September 30, 1999

Australian National Task Force on Cannabis “Despite the positive appraisal of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids …, they have not been widely used. … Part of the reason for this is that research on the therapeutic use of these compounds has become a casualty of the debate in the United States about the legal status of cannabis. … As a community we do not allow this type of thinking to deny the use of opiates for analgesia. Nor should it be used to deny access to any therapeutic uses of cannabinoid derivatives that may be revealed by pharmacological research.”  Reference: “The health and psychological consequences of cannabis use:” March 1994

Being Alive
“Being Alive has always supported a person’s right to choose their own treatment modalities including … efforts to legalize medical marijuana.”  Reference: letter from Executive Director Gary Costas (January 3, 1996)

Belgian Ministry of Health “[R]esearch has shown that cannabis can be of medicinal use…. This is an area where public health must prevail.” Reference: Statement of the Health Ministry, as quoted in Expatica.com (Brussels), September 4, 2003.

British House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology “Cannabis can be effective in some patients to relieve the symptoms of MS, and against certain forms of pain. This evidence is enough to justify a change in the law. … The Government should allow doctors to prescribe cannabis for medical use: this is the conclusion of a report by the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee, published today.”
Reference: Press release (“Lords Say: legalize Cannabis for Medical Use”) of the House of Lords: November 11, 1998.

British House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology (Second Report) “We are concerned that the MCA [Medicines Control Agency] approach to the licensing of cannabis-based medicines … place the requirements of safety and the needs of patients in an unacceptable balance. … Patients with severe conditions such as multiple sclerosis are being denied the right to make informed choices about their medication. There is always some risk in taking any medication, … but these concerns should not prevent them from having access to what promises to be the only effective medication available to them.” Reference: Select Committee on Science and Technology, Second Report: “Therapeutic Uses of Cannabis:” March 14, 2001.

British Medical Association
“Present evidence indicates that [cannabinoids] are remarkably safe drugs, with a side-effects profile superior to many drugs used for the same indications. … [The BMA] will urge the government to consider changing the Misuse of Drugs Act to allow the prescription of cannabinoids to patients with certain conditions causing distress that are not adequately controlled by existing treatments.”  Reference: BMA report: “Therapeutic Uses of Cannabis:” November 1997 California Academy of Family Physicians
“[The CAFP] supports efforts to expedite access to cannabinoids for use under the direction of a physician.”  Reference: position statement adapted by the Academy’s Congress of Delegates: February 1994

California Nurses Association “The California Nurses Association supports AB (Assembly Bill) 1529 which would eliminate California’s prohibition against possessing marijuana or growing marijuana for individuals using marijuana for medical purposes. … This measure is a compassionate alternative for patients … to obtain relief.” Reference: letter from CNA President Kurt Laumann, RN, to Gov. Pete Wilson (September 21, 1995)

California Pharmacists Association “[The CPA] support pharmacy participation in the legal distribution of medical marijuana.”  Reference: AP Financial News article, May 26, 1997

Canadian AIDS Society (Societe canadienne du sida) “The Canadian AIDS Society’s Board of Directors believes that people living with HIV/AIDS should have access to cannabis for therapeutic purposes in the treatment of HIV/AIDS through a compassionate framework. … [We] favor a controlled legalization system for cannabis in Canada, where the production, distribution and consumption are regulated, designated cannabis distribution centres are established and recognized, and appropriate prevention messages and harm reduction strategies are developed.” Reference: position statement adopted by the CAS’ Board of Directors: May 20, 2004

Medical Marijuana IS in over half of the United States. The majority of Americans favor the legalization. Why won't the U.S. government listen to the people that make this country what it is?
Medical Marijuana IS legal in half of the United States. The majority of Americans favor the legalization. Why won’t the U.S. government listen to the people that make this country America? A handful of rich politicians decide for the millions what is best for the millions. How many times has the government been right, especially about healthcare!

Canadian Special Senate Committee on Illegal Drugs “The Committee is of the opinion that the potential therapeutic uses of marijuana have been sufficiently documented to permit its use for therapeutic purposes.” Reference: “Cannabis: Our Position for a Canadian Public Policy: Report of the Senate Special Committee on Illegal Drugs,” presented to Parliament September 2002

Colorado Nurses Association “The Colorado Nurses Association recognize[s] the therapeutic use of cannabis [and] support efforts to end federal policies which prohibit or unnecessarily restrict marijuana’s legal availability for legitimate health care uses. … Marijuana must be placed in a less restrictive Schedule and made available to patients who may benefit from its use.” Reference: Colorado Nurses Association 1995 Conventional Directory and Book of Reports

Connecticut Nurses Association “[P]atients [should] have safe access to therapeutic marijuana/cannabis under appropriate prescriber supervision.” Reference: CNA Resolution: October 2004

Dean Edell, M.D. “Cannabinoids and THC also have strong pain-killing powers, which is one reason medical marijuana should be readily available to people with cancer and other debilitating diseases.”  Reference: statement of Dean Edell: March 2, 2000

Federation of American Scientists
“Based on much evidence, from patients and doctors alike, on the superior effectiveness and safety of whole cannabis compared to other medications, … the President should instruct the NIH and the Food and Drug Administration to make efforts to enroll seriously ill patients whose physicians believe that whole cannabis would be helpful to their conditions in clinical trials, both to allow data-gathering and to provide an alternative to the black market while the scientific questions about the possible utility of cannabis are resolved.”  Reference: FAS Petition on Medical Marijuana, November 1994

 Florida Governor’s Red Ribbon Panel on AIDS “Recommendations for care: The state should facilitate greater access to drug therapies for treatment as well as preventive therapy. This should include access to marijuana when medically indicated.”

Reference: Florida Governor’s Report: January 1993

Florida Medical Association
“The FMA urge the state and federal governments and U.S. Public Health Service to open limited access to medical marijuana by reopening the investigational new drug program to new applicants.”  Reference: FMA Resolution #97-61: adopted June 1997 French Ministry of Health
“Obviously, it should be possible to prescribe [cannabis.] For a doctor, that could be a real benefit.”
Reference: statements of French Health Minister Bernard Kouchner: Independent on Sunday, December 7, 1997 Hawaii Nurses Association
“[The HNA] support legislation to remove state level criminal penalties for both bona fide medical marijuana patients and their healthcare providers.”
Reference: HNA Resolution: adopted October 21, 1999.

Health Canada
“There is no problem, basically, with marijuana as a medicine. … Marijuana is no different than morphine, no different than codeine, no different than Aspirin.”  Reference: statements of Health Canada spokesman Dann Michols: Ottawa Citizen, December 19, 1997
* The Canadian government legalized the use of medical marijuana on July 31, 2001. Illinois Nurses Association
“It is the position of the Illinois Nurses Association to: Support the right of patients to have safe access to therapeutic cannabis under appropriate prescriber supervision; … [to] support legislation to remove criminal penalties including arrest and imprisonment for bonafide patients and prescribers of therapeutic cannabis; [and to] support federal and state legislation to include cannabis classification as a Schedule III [non-prohibited] drug.”
Reference: INA Position Statement: December 2004

Kaiser Permanente
“Medical guidelines regarding [marijuana's] prudent use should be established… Unfortunately, clinical research on potential therapeutic uses for marijuana has been difficult to accomplish in the United States, despite reasonable evidence for the efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and marijuana as anti-emetic and anti-glaucoma agents and the suggestive evidence for their efficacy in the treatment of other medical conditions, including AIDS.”
Reference: Kaiser Permanente study: “Marijuana Use and Mortality,” American Journal of Public Health, April 1997

Lymphoma Foundation of America “Be it resolved that this organization urges Congress and the President to enact legislation to reschedule marijuana to allow doctors to prescribe smokable marijuana to patients in need; and, Be it further resolved that this organization urges the US Public Health Service to allow limited access to medicinal marijuana by promptly reopening the Investigational New Drug compassionate access program to new applicants.”  Reference: Resolution approved by Lymphoma Foundation President Belita Cowan: January 20, 1997.

Medical Society of the State of New York “Assembly Bill 5796A … would allow certain patients … to use marijuana to treat a serious condition that is defined as a life-threatening condition or a condition associated with or a complication of such a condition or its treatment. … The Medical Society believes that this legislation would provide physicians, in consultation with their patient, another treatment option for those patients who are facing a life-threatening condition.” Reference: MSSNY e-news: May 7, 2004

Mississippi Nurses Association “The Mississippi Nurses Association support all reasonable efforts to end federal policies which prohibit or unnecessarily restrict marijuana’s legal availability for legitimate medical uses; and be it Resolved that the Mississippi Nurses Association provide education to the nurses of Mississippi about the therapeutic use of marijuana and federal prohibition of its use; and be it Resolved that the Virginia Nurses Association encourage other health care provider organizations to supp ort medical access to marijuana.” Reference: Resolution for Marijuana Access for Therapeutic Use, adopted by the MNA House of Delegates: October 27, 1995

The Montel Williams MS Foundation “Marijuana has helped my symptoms so much that I have become an advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana for qualified patients like me — those suffering from debilitating and/or devastatingly painful diseases. … Because I do not condone breaking any law, I would like to see all 50 states and the federal government decriminalize medical marijuana. I would also like to see more research into its effects on MS — for the treatment of pain and spasticity.” Reference: Press release (“Taking Action: Montel on Medical Marijuana & MS Treatment”) of the Montel Williams MS Foundation.

Multiple Sclerosis Society (Canada) “The MS Society of Canada welcomes Health Canada¹s initiative providing a more compassionate system of possession and production for individuals who feel they may benefit from the use of marijuana for medical purposes.” Reference: MS Society Viewpoint, July 2001.

The Multiple Sclerosis Society (United Kingdom) “People with MS have claimed that [marijuana] has helped them to relieve a number of the symptoms of MS including pain, stiffness and bladder problems. … We urge the courts to deal sympathetically with people with MS who are charged with cannabis use when seeking relief from their symptoms.” Reference: Policy statement: “Use of cannabis for alleviation of MS symptoms,” adopted August 2003

National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine (IOM)
“Scientific data indicate the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoid drugs, primarily THC, for pain relief, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation. … For certain patients, such as the terminally ill or those with debilitating symptoms, the long-term risks [associated with smoking] are not of great concern. … [Therefore,] clinical trials of marijuana for medical purposes should be conducted. … There are patients with debilitating symptoms for whom smoked marijuana might provide relief. … Except for the harms associated with smoking, the adverse effects of marijuana use are within the range of effects tolerated for other medications.”
Reference: “Marijuana as Medicine: Assessing the Science Base,” National Academy Press: Washington, DC. 1999

National Association for Public Health Policy “We … recommend the following … actions: The federal government should re-classify marijuana … out of the Schedule 1 category and allow their prescription where medically appropriate.”
Reference: Position paper adopted by the National Association for Public Health Policy: November 15, 1998. National Nurses Society on Addictions “The National Nurses Society on Addictions urges the federal government to remove marijuana from the Schedule I category immediately, and make it available for physicians to prescribe. NNSA urges the American Nurses’ Association and other health care professional organizations to support patient access to this medicine.”  Reference: “Position Paper: Access to Therapeutic Cannabis,” approved by the NNSA Board of Directors: May 1, 1995

Netherlands Ministry of Health* “Cannabis has a beneficial effect for many patients. From September 1, 2003 pharmacies can provide medicinal cannabis to patients with a prescription from a doctor.” Reference: Statement of the Health Ministry, as quoted by Reuters News Wire, September 1, 2003. * The Dutch government made marijuana available by prescription on September 1, 2003.

New England Journal of Medicine “Federal authorities should rescind their prohibition of the medical use of marijuana for seriously ill patients and allow physicians to decide which patients to treat. The government should change marijuana’s status from that of a Schedule I drug … to that of a Schedule II drug … and regulate it accordingly.”
Reference: Editorial by NEJM editor Dr. Jerome Kassirer, January 30, 1997

New Jersey State Nurses Association “The NJSNA recognizes the therapeutic value and safety of medically recommended marijuana and … supports legal access to medically recommended marijuana for patients in New Jersey who are under the care of a licensed health care provider.” ReferenceNew Jersey State Nurses Association Press Release (March 25, 2002)

New Mexico Medical Society “The New Mexico Medical Society … supports the medical use of marijuana for patients suffering from cancer, AIDS, and other serious or terminal conditions.” ReferenceLetter from Society President Allan Haynes (January 21, 2002)


New Mexico Nurses Association “NMNA has voted to endorse the concept of allowing the therapeutic use of marijuana in a variety of disease states … when conventional treatments are ineffective.”  Reference: Letter from NMNA President Ginny Guido (July 28, 1997)


New South Wales (Australia) Parliamentary Working Party on the use of Cannabis for Medical Purposes “The Working Party is in sympathy with the motivation and spirit of the recommendations in the Institute of Medicine and House of Lords reports. Accordingly, it recommends the introduction in NSW of a compassionate regime to assist those suffering from [a] range of illnesses … to gain the benefits associated with the use of cannabis without facing criminal sanctions, pending the development of safer and more efficient methods to deliver cannabinoids.” Reference: “Report of the Working Party on the Use of Cannabis for Medical Purposes,” Executive Summary, Recommendation 9: August 2000

New York County Medical Society “The definitive review of scientific studies … found medical benefits related to pain relief, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation. … While there are a variety of ways of supplying marijuana for medical use, serious consideration should be given to the 1997 recommendation … that the FDA reclassify marijuana from Schedule I and provide a consistent, safe supply.” Reference: testimony of Zebulon Taintor, representing the New York County Medical Society before the New York City Health Committee: February 23, 2004

New York State Nurses Association “Marijuana has been found to be effective in the treatment of glaucoma by reducing intraocular pressure and in reducing nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. Marijuana has also been effective in stimulating the appetite of AIDS patients suffering from the wasting syndrome, controlling spasticity in spinal cord injury patients, and in controlling seizures for persons suffering from epilepsy and for persons with multiple sclerosis. …The NYSNA Peer Assistance Committee agrees with the intent and content of the resolution ‘Legalizing Marijuana for Medical Purposes.'”  Reference: “Position Statement on Medicinal Marijuana,” passed by the NYSNA Board of Directors: June 7, 1995

North Carolina Nurses Association “NCNA urges the Administration and Congress to make cannabis available as a legal medicine were shown to be safe and effective and to immediately allow access to therapeutic cannabis through the Investigational New Drug Program.” Reference: “Position Statement on Therapeutic Use of Cannabis,” adopted by the NCNA: October 15, 1996

Rhode Island Medical Society “The Medical Society supports H-7588, it is consistent with our belief that there is sufficient evidence for us to support any physician-patient relationship that believes the use of marijuana will be beneficial to the patient.” Reference: Steve DeTroy, Director of Government and Public Affairs

Rhode Island State Nurses Association “[We support] legislation to remove criminal penalties including arrest and imprisonment for bona fide patients and prescribers of therapeutic marijuana/cannabis.” Reference: Press release (“Two Rhode Island Medical Groups Endorse Medical Marijuana”) of the Marijuana Policy Project: April 6, 2004

San Francisco Mayor’s Summit on AIDS and HIV “Marijuana must continue to be available to persons living with AIDS and HIV and other diseases who wish to use it for pain management, appetite stimulation and other medicinal purposes.” Reference: “Mayor’s Summit on AIDS & HIV,” preliminary report released January 27, 1998

San Francisco Medical Society
“The SFMS takes a support position on the California Medical Marijuana Initiative.”
Reference: Motion passed by SFMS Board of Directors: August 8, 1996

Virginia Nurses Association “The Virginia Nurses Association support all reasonable efforts to end federal policies which prohibit or unnecessarily restrict marijuana’s legal availability for legitimate medical uses; and be it Resolved that the Virginia Nurses Association provide education to the nurses of Virginia on the therapeutic use of marijuana and federal prohibition of its use; and be it Resolved that the Virginia Nurses Association encourage other health care provider organizations to support medical access to marijuana.” Reference: Resolution passed by the VNA Delegate Assembly: October7, 1994

Andrew Weil, M.D. “I consider the most important recommendation made by the IOM (Institute of Medicine) panel [to be] that physicians be able to prescribe marijuana to individual patients with debilitating or terminal conditions. … I believe such compassionate use is justified.” Reference: “Why I support Medical Marijuana,” in Self Healing, July 1999.

Vermont Medical Marijuana Study Committee “There is medical value in using marijuana to ameliorate some symptoms associated with severe illnesses and the treatment thereof. … Marijuana is misclassified as a [federal] Schedule I drug and should be reclassified to permit physicians to prescribe and pharmacies to dispense medical marijuana.” Reference: “Report of the Medical Marijuana Study Committee,” preliminary report to the Vermont General Assembly: December 2002

Whitman-Walker Clinic “Whitman-Walker Clinic supports the valid use of marijuana, under a physician’s supervision, to help alleviate AIDS wasting syndrome and nausea associated with treatment regimens.” Reference: Whitman-Walker News, April 1998

Wisconsin Nurses Association “The Wisconsin Nurses Association urges the Governor of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Legislature to move expeditiously to make cannabis available as a legally prescribed medicine where shown to be safe and effective.” Reference: Resolution adopted by WNA: October 29, 1999

Health Organizations Supporting Medical Marijuana ResearchAmerican Cancer Society

“[California Senate Bill] 535 focuses on medical marijuana research. [The] American Cancer Society … supports S.B. 535 because it is consistent with our long-held position of supporting research of any agent or technique for which there may be evidence of a therapeutic advantage.”  Reference: letter from ACS to California State Senator John Vasconcellos (July 24, 1997)

American Medical Association “The AMA recommend that adequate and well-controlled studies of smoked marijuana be conducted in patients who have serious conditions for which preclinical, anecdotal, or controlled evidence suggests possible efficacy in including AIDS wasting syndrome, sever acute or delayed emesis induced by chemotherapy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, dystonia, and neuropathic pain.”  Reference: Council on Scientific Affairs Report #10: Medical Marijuana

British Medical Journal “The role of cannabinoids in modern therapeutics remains uncertain, but the evidence … shows that it would be irrational not to explore it. The active components of a plant which has been prized as a medicine for thousands of years should not be discarded lightly, and certainly not through political expediency or as a casualty of the war on drugs.”  Reference: editorial of the BMJ, April 4, 1998

California Medical Association
“The CMA urge that carefully designed, controlled clinical trials of the effectiveness of inhaled marijuana for medical indications be allowed to proceed immediately. … The CMA immediately initiate efforts at the federal level to facilitate the availability of inhaled marijuana for use in conducting clinical research to determine the medical efficacy of marijuana.”  Reference: CMA Resolution #107a-97: Medical Marijuana : adopted April 1997

California Society on Addiction Medicine (CSAM) “CSAM supports controlled studies of the medical usefulness of marijuana, including all routes of administration, and especially supports studies on the therapeutic effects of the essential ingredients … of cannabis sativa. … CSAM urges the DEA to remove cannabis from Schedule I and move it to an appropriate Schedule, below Schedule I as determined by what is known about its therapeutic benefit.”  Reference: CSAM “Position on Medical Use of Marijuana in California” as it appeared in CSAM News, Spring 1997

Congress of Nursing Practice
“The Congress of Nursing Practice … support education for RN’s regarding current evidence based therapeutic uses of cannabis, [and] support investigation of therapeutic efficacy of cannabis in controlled trials.”  Reference: Motion passed by the CNP: May 31, 1996

Jamaican National Commission on Ganja “The broad range of potential therapeutic applications of cannabinoids reflects the wide distribution of cannabinoid receptors throughout the brain and other parts of the body. … Areas in which cannabis has been shown to have therapeutic use are: reducing nausea and vomiting, stimulating appetite, promoting weight gain, diminishing high intraocular pressure from glaucoma. … There is undoubtedly need for much further research into the potential of the medicinal use of cannabis and its extracts.” Reference: Report of the National Commission on Ganja,” presented to Parliament August 7, 2001

Gay and Lesbian Medical Association
“[We] support … the authorization and implementation of clinical trials of marijuana for various aspects of AIDS treatment.”  Reference: Gay and Lesbian Medical Association Policy Statement #066-95-104: adopted May 1995

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Workshop on the Medical Utility of Marijuana
“Marijuana looks promising enough to recommend that there be new controlled studies done. The indications in which varying levels of interest was expressed are the following: appetite stimulation/cachexia, nausea and vomiting following anticancer therapy, neurological and movement disorders, analgesia, [and] glaucoma. Accordingly, the NIH should consider relevant administrative mechanisms to facilitate grant applications in each of these areas. Whether or not the NIH is the primary source of grant support for a proposed bona fide clinical research study, if that study meets U.S. regulatory standards … protocol approval, … the study should receive marijuana.”  Reference: Workshop on the Medical Utility of Marijuana: “Report to the Director:” August 1997

Texas Medical Association “The Texas Medical Association supports (1) the physician’s right to discuss with his/her patients any and all possible treatment options related to the patients’ health and clinical care, including the use of marijuana, without the threat to the physician or patient of regulatory, disciplinary, or criminal sanctions; and (2) further well-controlled studies of the use of marijuana with seriously ill patients who may benefit from such alternative treatment.” Reference: Resolution adopted by the TMA Council on Scientific Affairs: April 29, 2004

Vermont Medical Society “VMS” current policy on medical marijuana focuses on the need for additional scientific research, the need for free and open discussion between physicians and patients and the need to exercise caution in view of federal criminal penalties for prescribing marijuana or aiding or abetting patients to violate federal law.” Reference: VMS Legislative Bulletin: February 10, 2003

Wisconsin State Medical Society “The SMS urges the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to implement administrative procedures to facilitate grant applications and the conduct of well-designed clinical research into the medical utility of marijuana. …The SMS believes that the NIH should use its resources and influence to support the development of a smoke-free inhaled delivery system for marijuana.”  Reference: SMS Policy Compendium 2000-2001 – Alternative Medicine.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Help show your support for ending the 40 year war on Black Americans and the Poor, which Nixon started. We all know Nixon was A CROOK! Plus, that was 40 years ago, we have piles of science that indicates the medicinal value of marijuana! #PTSD. Just click on the image to sign our petition to end this racist war. America has enough wars to pay for and worry about.

Original information from NORML.

Prohibition Still Doesn't Work!

Majority of Law Enforcement Officers Want to Reform Marijuana Laws.

Prohibition Still Doesn't Work!
Prohibition Still Doesn’t Work! Never did and never will. Education NOT incarceration! #EducationNotIncarceration

survey released this week by the publication Law Officer revealed that a majority of law enforcement officers want to see our country’s marijuana laws reformed.

The poll, which questioned over 11,000 law enforcement officers regarding their opinions on drug policy, revealed that just over 64% believed our marijuana laws needed to be relaxed in some form. When asked “Do you believe possession of marijuana for personal use should…” and presented with several options, 35.68% of respondents stated that marijuana be legalized, regulated and taxed, 10.84% chose that it should be be legalized for medical reasons and with a doctor’s prescription only, 14.24% said it should continue to be illegal but only punished via fines (no incarceration), and 3.68% said marijuana should simply be decriminalized. Only 34.7% believed marijuana should continue to be illegal with the criminal penalties that are currently in place.

“This poll reveals that support for marijuana prohibition is eroding even amongst those who are serving on the front lines enforcing it,” stated NORML Communications Director Erik Altieri, “When a majority of the American people and most of those tasked with implementing a law disagree with it in principle, it is time to change that law.”

You can view the full results of this survey here.

“Prohibition cannot be enforced for the simple reason that the majority of the American people do not want it enforced and are resisting its enforcement. That being so, the orderly thing to do under our form of government is to abolish a law that cannot be enforced, a law which the people of the country do not want enforced.” – New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia on alcohol prohibition.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

For original article CLICK HERE.

Thank you,

Emery Myers aka @cannablogna #EducationNotIncarceration

April 19, 2014

Study: Enactment Of Medical Cannabis Laws Not Associated With Higher Crime Rates.

Marijuana Myths and Facts.
Marijuana Myths and Facts.

The enactment of medicinal cannabis laws is not associated with any rise in statewide criminal activity and may even be related to reductions in incidences of violent crime, according to data published online in the journal PLoS ONE.

Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas tracked crime rates across all 50 states between the years between 1990 and 2006, a time period during which 11 states legalized marijuana for medical use. Authors reviewed FBI data to determine whether there existed any association between the passage of medicinal cannabis laws and varying rates of statewide criminal activity, specifically reported crimes of homicide, rape, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft.

Investigators reported that the passage of medical marijuana laws was not associated with an increase in any of the seven crime types assessed, but that liberalized laws were associated with decreases in certain types of violent crime.

“The central finding gleaned from the present study was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault,” authors reported. “Interestingly, robbery and burglary rates were unaffected by medicinal marijuana legislation, which runs counter to the claim that dispensaries and grow houses lead to an increase in victimization due to the opportunity structures linked to the amount of drugs and cash that are present. Although, this is in line with prior research suggesting that medical marijuana dispensaries may actually reduce crime in the immediate vicinity.”

Researchers concluded: “Medical marijuana laws were not found to have a crime exacerbating effect on any of the seven crime types. On the contrary, our findings indicated that MML precedes a reduction in homicide and assault. … In sum, these findings run counter to arguments suggesting the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes poses a danger to public health in terms of exposure to violent crime and property crimes.”

SIGN THE PETITION FOR ALL THOSE WHO CAN'T. IT's not up to us what treatment an individual American feels works best for them and theirs! Thats Freedom!
SIGN THE PETITION FOR ALL THOSE WHO CAN’T. IT’s not up to us what treatment an individual American feels works best for them and theirs! Thats Freedom! Just click the button to sign. It only takes a second.

Full text of the study, “The Effect of Medical Marijuana Laws on Crime: Evidence from State Panel Data, 1990-2006,” appears online here.

For original article please click HERE.

@Cannablogna #EducationNotIncarceration

www.cannablogna.com #educatenotincarcerate

Are we all deluded? America, Politics and the Racist, 40 year war on Drugs(the poor).

Deluded… Delusional… Are we all simply deluded? Were we programmed from birth, by pre-formatted parents? Were our grandparents and their parents beliefs, morals and ideals forged from governmental guidelines and religious rules?

de·lu·sion·al

[dih-loo-zhuh-nl]  Show IPA

adjective

1.having false or unrealistic beliefs or opinions: Senators who   think they will get agreement on comprehensive tax bill are   delusional.
2.Psychiatry. maintaining fixed false beliefs even when   confronted with facts, usually as a result of mental illnessHe was so delusional and paranoid that he thought  everybody was conspiring against him.

Sounds far-fetched, I know. Just the title screams “conspiracy theory” without making a sound! I think many of us can relate to the thin line between delusion and reality! This is the space that is widening for middle-class Americans. Our country is now the ultra rich and the poor. There is a war on the poor happening in America right now.

Forty years ago, President Nixon started the “War on Drugs”. We know this war has only been effective in destroying the lives of the poor. We know this war has been a racist war on the poor as well, affecting people of Color, disproportionately so from Caucasians.

www.cannablogna.com
40 years of the war on drugs and our government is still waging a racist war on the poor. This is fact. Look at the statistics. The statistics are black and white! Click on the image to view full size image. Image courtesy of Google Images.

This war has affected the poor and people of color more than any other group in the U.S. Please see the informative graph below. It simply explains the racism involved in this broken, immoral war that has been going on for 40 years. It is time to end this racism and incarceration. We need education not incarceration for drug abuse and non-violent drug offenders.

www.cannablogna.com #educatenotincarcerate
Incarceration rates in the United States by race. This accurate graph indicates the racism involved in our broken War on Drugs started by President Nixon 40 years ago. Countless Americans have had their lives ruined over this war.

Recently, a man in a southern state, was sentenced to 13 years in prison, with 5 of those years being hard labor for possession of 2 marijuana cigarettes. Mandatory minimum sentences are killing families in America.

NEW ORLEANS—The Drug Policy Alliance filed an amicus brief today urging the Louisiana Supreme Court to review the egregious prison sentence of Bernard Noble, a 48-year old man who was sentenced to 13.3 years of hard labor in prison without the opportunity for parole for possessing the equivalent of two marijuana cigarettes.”

Americans, it is time to end this horrible, human-rights violation, called the War on Drugs. This war has proved to be a racist war that has actually increased the amount of illicit drugs used and has caused the destruction of millions of families over 40 years. The War on Drugs has not protected people. It has been a huge waste of money, resources and life. Thousands upon thousands of Americans and others in surrounding countries have been killed by cartels, law enforcement and black market drug deals and it is all linked back to the terrible, failed War on Drugs! Let’s also not forget all those police officers killed in the line of duty and the innocent victims of the war on drugs.

It is early in Colorado’s legalization movement, but so far, crime rates have gone down substantially and the state’s tax revenues from legal marijuana are in the millions of dollars. This is a win/win situation so far for Colorado. Take away the demand by decriminalizing, regulating, taxing and educating citizens on marijuana and the benefits and dangers. Anything in excess is bad, whether it be alcohol or allergy medication.

Please add your name to the petition below by clicking on the icon and sign the petition to end the prohibition on Marijuana. It is time to take this first step. 13 years in prison for 1 or 2 grams of a natural plant? This is real, click the link above for the news story. this just happened! The man charged with this will be over 60 years old when he gets out of prison, if he gets out of prison. His family life, his job, his everything is gone because of 2 little cigarettes of marijuana… for his own personal use. He wasn’t doing anything violent or assaulting anyone. He was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Now his life is ruined for the time being. Also, tax-payers will be paying for 13 years of his life in prison for 2 marijuana joints! This is insane. End the police state that we all live in!

Please, if you have empathy for your fellow Americans, help end the suffering from this immoral, human rights travesty called the War on Drugs!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

Article written by Emery Myers

April 18, 2014

 

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16

Current Congressional Cannabis News in America.

Eric Holder Would Be ‘Glad To Work With Congress’ To Reschedule Marijuana

ERIC HOLDER

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration would be willing to work with Congress if lawmakers want to take marijuana off the list of what the federal government considers the most dangerous drugs, Attorney General Eric Holder said Friday.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans. People are SUFFERING and Dying every DAY in America because of the failed “War on Drugs”.

“We’d be more than glad to work with Congress if there is a desire to look at and reexamine how the drug is scheduled, as I said there is a great degree of expertise that exists in Congress,” Holder said during a House Appropriations Committee hearing. “It is something that ultimately Congress would have to change, and I think that our administration would be glad to work with Congress if such a proposal were made.”

Several members of Congress have called on the administration to downgrade cannabis on its own without waiting for congressional action. Under the federal Controlled Substances Act, the attorney general has the authority to “remove any drug or other substance from the schedules if he finds that the drug or other substance does not meet the requirements for inclusion in any schedule.” Holder didn’t indicate Friday that he would be willing to do that unilaterally.

Although there haven’t been any documented cases of deaths from overdosing on marijuana, the federal government treats it as a Schedule I drug with a “high potential for abuse,” along with heroin, LSD and Ecstasy.

Re-categorizing marijuana would not legalize the drug under federal law, but it couldmake research into marijuana’s medical benefits much easier and allow marijuana businesses to take tax deductions.

Several Republican lawmakers at the hearing questioned Holder’s decision to allow Colorado and Washington to legalize and regulate marijuana and to take the states’ actions into consideration when prioritizing federal marijuana prosecutions. But Holder said that he was “not sure that you’re going to see a huge difference” between the cases the Justice Department was bringing before and after guidance went out to U.S. attorneys on which cases to prioritize.

“We’re not blazing a new trail,” Holder said of the decision to prosecute only certain cases based on the department’s limited resources, noting that much of marijuana law enforcement happens on the state and local levels.

Any move to reschedule marijuana would probably face resistance from the Drug Enforcement Administration, which Holder oversees. DEA chief Michele Leonhart said this week that the growing acceptance of marijuana only makes her agents “fight harder.”

For full article click HERE.

cops-banks-dealers-for-prohibition

Real American’s Quotes From Our Petition for the Compassionate Use of Cannabis/Decriminalization for AMERICANs!

These are real quotes that I have copied and pasted. I have left the people’s names off for anonymity.

We all know the hypocrisy of the government allowing cigarettes and alcohol to be taxed and regulated. Both of which have NO medical applications, yet Cannabis is kept a schedule 1 drug, along with Heroin and PCP. Cocaine is considered a schedule 2 drug. Xanax and Lortab are schedule 3 drugs. Schedule 1 drugs are considered to have NO medical benefit. 20 states have enacted medical marijuana laws and many more are working on medical marijuana laws right now…except KANSAS!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

Politicians argue that Cannabis is “so much stronger now”. Well, what about 190 proof Everclear…which is an alcoholic drink that will kill you if you drink too much. It is impossible to overdose on Cannabis, unless you can smoke 1500 pounds of it in 30 minutes. If you smoke 1500 pounds of anything in 15 minutes, your probably not going to fare to well!

Here we go with the quotes from real people across America!

1. Erie, Pennsylvania: “marijuana has so many positive uses yet the government will not legalize it does that make any sense at all”

2. Glendale, CA: “Free the people!”

3. Helper, Utah: “Make it medically available..”

4. St. Joseph, MO: “As a nurse I have seen cancer patients writhing in agony, waiting for their next pain shot. Marijuana not only can relieve pain and mental anguish, but also stimulates the appetite to reverse the wasting and emaciation so common in terminally ill patients. Yet these people cannot legally obtain or use marijuana in most states to alleviate pain or improve their quality of life in the time they have left.”

5. Phoenix, AZ: “I have PTSD and it sucks, I think anyone with PTSD should be able to be prescribed cannabis, it’s helped me with my PTSD, I have PTSD from rapes and abuse in the past. I approve c:”

6. Edinburgh, Maine: “Do the right thing. By the way NO you’re not doing it at this time.”

7. Conway, SC: “We need to stop living in the dark ages and move forward.These people deserve the right to have medicine that helps them with out the serious side effects of. the drugs that’s out there now.”

8. Cambridge City, IN: “I strongly agree.”

9. Enterprise, KS: “It will not only help the people in the state, it will help our state! Please hear us!”

10. Salina, KS: “Please Please Please listen to the people! Majority of the people in Kansas are in favor of changing marijuana laws and we need your help!”

11. Glendale, CA: “I defer all questions to Dr. Sanjay Gupta.”

12. Sm, KS: “Put CHILD MOLESTERS and MURDERERS in PRISON for LIFE with NO chance of PAROLE. Let NON-violent “offenders” free or pay a nominal fee.”

13. Newton, KS: “It’s time for a more intelligent and compassionate approach to marijuana sales and use, especially for medical purposes.”

14. Wichita, KS: “I have a loved one with Crohn’s disease, and know that individual – an ethical, professional, and dedicated public servant – uses cannabis for the pain and nausea. I think we should give people access to medically necessary drugs to improve their functioning and decrease pain!!”

15. Wichita, KS: “Helps eye pressure for glocauma, cures cancer when injested, helps fibromyalgia. Get kansas into the 21 century.”

16. Wichita, KS: “Medical use should be permitted and regulated.”

17. Olathe, KS: “I have always been in agreement that marijuana should be legalized for medicinal uses as I was/am an AIDS patient. But the HIV is under control and have just now been diagnosed with cancer and will begin chemo radiation this week. I expect marijuana to be part of my refi mine to control nausea but more importantly, assisting with my appetite and make me want to eat.”

18. Auburn, KS: “I agree whole-hearted that this should be reevaluated and ultimately legalized. It is also a mood stabilizer that many people prefer to using prescription drugs. Yet another use…hmmm. :-)”

19. Sedan, KS: “We have spent billions of dollars on the war against drugs, learning nothing from our experience with the crime caused by prohibition in the ’20s. Lets help the people who can be relieved by the medical use of marijuana.”

20. Topeka, KS: “It’s time to walk back this ineffective, wasteful body of legislation and end the war on marijuana, particularly for medical needs.”

21. Overland Park, KS: “I completely agree. Our country should invest in cannabis – rather than villify and incarcerate those involved with its industry”

22. Wichita, KS: “With over 100 uses of the marijuana plant as of the 1930s, what could be created now with current knowledge and technology surely would be amazing and also very beneficial towards our needed economic growth. However, it takes open minds and open hearts to step out of fears and persecutions of differing others, and into loving wisdom for the advancement of ourselves into a more civilized and evolved culture. Hopefully Kansans are up to this opportunity for social and economic progress.”

23. Wichita, KS: “It’s been a long time comin and needs to be done now pmk”

24. Lawrence, KS: “This is the truth, and millions of people are recognizing it now. Be on the right side of history for once. Stop ruining lives and wasting money on prisons, and start helping lives to be improved while collecting tax revenues. It just makes sense!”

25. Inman, KS: “Time to stop the insanity! The medicinal uses of marijuana have been studied and it has been proven effective on many fronts including reducing intraoccular pressure in glaucoma patients which was not mentioned here. It’s said Queen Victoria used to smoke it to relieve menstrual cramps!”

26. Hutchinson, KS: “the government should listen to the American people. both science & medical evidence is to overwhelming and we need to act now. I also work in the healthcare field and totally agree.”

27. Wichita, KS: “LEGALIZE MARIJANA IN KANSAS”

28. Topeka, KS: “I have no problem with the use of marijuana to treat illness.”

29. Oswego, KS:  “I think the petition should be supported by MoveOn. Marijuana is proving to be a kind of wonder drug. It should, at the very least, be available for medical use. Even better, make it available through legal means so it can be a legitimate revenue stream.”

30: Topeka, KS: “If it can benefit medical conditions I say go for legalization. Save the war for drugs with much more harmful effects.”

31. Stillwater, OK: “I have just been diagnosed with Crohn’s. Please pass this bill for all of those who suffer.”

32. Salina, KS: “It’s time for change. What can be argued about using a plant that God has given us over man made pharmaceuticals!”

33. Westfall, KS: “I strongly agree with the act of legalization of medical & recreational use of marijuana.”

34. Longmont, CO: “Good idea ! It IS 2014 .”

35. Smolan, KS: “Marijuana, either medical or recreational, should be legalized and mandated in a similar way to alcohol. More people die from alcohol than marijuana and it makes no sense why it is illegal!”

36. Salina, KS: “End the racist drug war on the poor. President Nixon started this war and it has victimized millions of non-violent cannabis users ever since. It has ruined lives and families. End it!”

These quotes are all verbatim from Kansans and All Americans! The Silver Hair Legislation of KS. supports HB2198 and SB9; The Cannabis Compassion and Care Act.               (click on to read the very well written bill).

Please read the bill and I guarantee, if you are not sure, you will be. Also, if after reading the above quotes you are unsure, you need to look up the word EMPATHY in the dictionary!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.
www.cannablogna.com
Emery Myers USMC 1990 -1998 Desert Storm Vet. I served America and will continue to serve as a registered nurse, father and advocate for all Americans, especially the chronically ill and terminally ill. Please, join this Marine in the fight for our freedom to use a medicinal herb!

Written by Emery Myers, activist, registered nurse, writer, artist and advocate for Americans and their constitutional rights!