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Narcissistic personality disorder…What is it? Do you know somebody…read more…click link…

emery myers:

Do you know someone that most people can’t stand due to their huge ego? Does the person drive you crazy? If so, this article is for you!

Originally posted on www.CannaBlogna.com: We enjoy your company...Keep coming back! :

Narcissistic personality disorder

How do you spot a narcissist image from www.vtdigger.org via Google Images
How do you spot a narcissist? Image from http://www.vtdigger.org via Google Images

Have you heard of the word narcissist before? What does the word mean to you? For many years, I thought it was simply, a person that loved one’s self more than anyone else…a person that was an ‘ego-maniac’. Simple…much too simple, as I have found out over the years.

Narcissist’s naturally have over-inflated perceptions of themselves’. Narcissistic personality disorder is characterized by dramatic, emotional behavior, which is in the same category as antisocial and borderline personality disorders.

Why-We-Love-Narcissists image courtesy of www.interrete.org via Google Images
Why-We-Love-Narcissists image courtesy of http://www.interrete.org via Google Images

Narcissistic personality disorder symptoms may include:

  • Believing that you’re better than others
  • Fantasizing about power, success and attractiveness
  • Exaggerating your achievements or talents
  • Expecting constant praise and admiration
  • Believing that you’re special and acting accordingly
  • Failing to recognize other people’s emotions and feelings
  • Expecting others to go along with your ideas…

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Narcissism image courtesy of www.bowden2bowden.com via Google Images

Narcissistic personality disorder…What is it? Do you know somebody…read more…click link…

Narcissistic personality disorder

How do you spot a narcissist image from www.vtdigger.org via Google Images
How do you spot a narcissist? Image from http://www.vtdigger.org via Google Images

Have you heard of the word narcissist before? What does the word mean to you? For many years, I thought it was simply, a person that loved one’s self more than anyone else…a person that was an ‘ego-maniac’. Simple…much too simple, as I have found out over the years.

Narcissist’s naturally have over-inflated perceptions of themselves’. Narcissistic personality disorder is characterized by dramatic, emotional behavior, which is in the same category as antisocial and borderline personality disorders.

Why-We-Love-Narcissists image courtesy of www.interrete.org via Google Images
Why-We-Love-Narcissists image courtesy of http://www.interrete.org via Google Images

Narcissistic personality disorder symptoms may include:

  • Believing that you’re better than others
  • Fantasizing about power, success and attractiveness
  • Exaggerating your achievements or talents
  • Expecting constant praise and admiration
  • Believing that you’re special and acting accordingly
  • Failing to recognize other people’s emotions and feelings
  • Expecting others to go along with your ideas and plans
  • Taking advantage of others
  • Expressing disdain for those you feel are inferior
  • Being jealous of others
  • Believing that others are jealous of you
  • Trouble keeping healthy relationships
  • Setting unrealistic goals
  • Being easily hurt and rejected
  • Having a fragile self-esteem
  • Appearing as tough-minded or unemotional

Although some features of narcissistic personality disorder may seem like having confidence or strong self-esteem, it’s not the same. Narcissistic personality disorder crosses the border of healthy confidence and self-esteem into thinking so highly of yourself that you put yourself on a pedestal. In contrast, people who have healthy confidence and self-esteem don’t value themselves more than they value others.

Celebrities are more likely to be narcissistic. Image courtesy of www.independent.ie via Google Images
Celebrities are more likely to be narcissistic according to the most recent psychological science. Excessive “Selfies” are also an indicator of narcissism.                                    Image courtesy of http://www.independent.ie via Google Images

When you have narcissistic personality disorder, you may come across as conceited, boastful or pretentious. You often monopolize conversations. You may belittle or look down on people you perceive as inferior. You may have a sense of entitlement. And when you don’t receive the special treatment to which you feel entitled, you may become very impatient or angry. You may insist on having “the best” of everything — the best car, athletic club, medical care or social circles, for instance.

But underneath all this behavior often lies a fragile self-esteem. You have trouble handling anything that may be perceived as criticism. You may have a sense of secret shame and humiliation. And in order to make yourself feel better, you may react with rage or contempt and efforts to belittle the other person to make yourself appear better.

This information from the Mayo Clinic Staff, is intended for educational/entertainment. If you feel you have any mental issues, please contact your doctor. This article is simply explaining what a narcissist really is.

Thank you for reading.

~Cannablogna Staff~

For original source information, please click HERE.

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China’s Real Estate Downturn Spells Trouble for Global Economy

Originally posted on TIME:

“Will the government save the market if housing prices fall?” That was the question being asked in China this week — not by stressed-out mortgage holders, but by the country’s most famous (and wealthy) property mogul, Pan Shiyi.

Pan, the chairman of giant real estate developer SOHO China, has made a series of pronouncements in recent weeks that reflect an increasingly bearish long-term outlook for China’s property sector.

At an industry forum in late May, Pan compared the nation’s real estate prospects to the Titanic. “It [the real estate industry] will soon hit the iceberg in front of it,” he declared.

Pan’s outlook may be bleak, but is borne out by statistics. According to Standard & Poor’s, residential housing prices in China will drop by 5% this year — a dramatic reversal from last year’s rise of 11.5%.

That’s bad news for China’s property holders, but potentially also a…

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They will take our guns courtesy of wwwdotfunnyjunkdotcom

Common Sense is Genius in It’s Working Clothes.

Common Sense is Genius in It’s Working Clothes.

written by Emery Myers, May 23rd, 2014

Common Sense is Genius image courtesy of whatantseesdotwordpressdotcom
Common Sense is Genius… image courtesy of http://www.whatantsees.wordpress.com

What happened to common sense in America? Did it ever truly exist? It’s hard to answer this question without relying on what other humans recorded throughout human history. Some recorded history is accurate… I am sure of that, but much of recorded history is, dare I say, conjecture, hear-say, mistakes and recorded decades after the fact. Impossible to prove much of ancient history…unless we have tangible evidence and the science scholars involved. If you don’t accept science, carbon-14 dating, or evolutionary biology, physics and the other sciences, then you probably aren’t going to agree with this article.

Common Sense image courtesy of universityofcommonsensedotcom
Common Sense image courtesy of http://www.universityofcommonsense.com

I am a college graduate. My wife is a college graduate. College education did not teach either of us what common sense is. We had common sense before college. Education does not gift a person with common sense. I have worked with many people in my life and I’ll take common sense over education level any time of the day! I have met people with 10-plus years of higher education and absolutely no common sense… Some of the most brilliant minds I have ever known have a very limited educational background but are the epitome of common sense and intelligent decision-making!

Common Sense Bring it Back courtesy of wwwdotsalescoachdocom
Common Sense, Bring it Back courtesy of http://www.salescoach.com

Seriously… Bring it back now! Americans are either too afraid to speak up and use their first amendment rights, or lack good, old commonsense! The majority in Cannablogna’s polling indicates the latter… commonsense is endangered! It is quickly becoming non-existent in our America. This is what the leaders of huge corporations and our political system count on. The powers that be want us to be scared, confused and fearful of everything. It keeps us “controlled”. It keeps us in our social caste. It forces us to be consumers! It Keeps us… the 99 PERCENT!

common sense just because you can courtesy of wwwdotsodaheaddotcom
Common sense, just because you can… courtesy of http://www.sodahead.com

I have quite literally, been killed, hundreds of times in my work career. The majority of accidents were caused by idiots as pictured above! We all have seen them, tried to communicate with them, and tried to pull their weight. The people lacking common sense… their numbers are growing rapidly! The CDC should have released a report years ago! How many people die in workplace accidents or are seriously injured, due to someone else’s lack of common sense? We know all too well that it was probably an idiot lacking commonsense.

That Video, courtesy of Youtube.com, pretty much wraps up any further need for explanation.

Your friend in commonsense,

Emery Myers, contributing author for http://www.cannablogna.com, and http://www.darwinsrightleftwing.com

Please sign this petition if you believe in commonsense!

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans.

 

 

 

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Cannabis Scientifically Proven to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease, Cancer, Epilepsy, Chronic Pain and Parkinson’s Disease Among Other Serious Medical Conditions.

Cannabis Proven to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease, Cancer and Parkinson’s Disease Among Other Serious Medical Conditions.

dr-sanjay-gupta-why-i-changed-my-mind-on-weed
Neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta was against Cannabis in a 2009 TIME magazine article. Now, he is one of the biggest advocates of the natural medicine. Image courtesy of Google Images.

This isn’t a new development. Ancient man used cannabis for pain relief, medicinal qualities and religious/spiritual rituals, among many other uses both medicinal and industrial.

Cannabis oil has been found in the mummified remains of Egyptians, ancient Chinese writings and cave drawings. For more information and timeline of Cannabis use in Human History, please click the green link:

History of Cannabis Use in Humans.

There are thousands of patient testimonials, physician testimonials and scientific articles on the health effects of Cannabis. Of course, every medicine has side effects and I would be remiss to suggest that this plant works for everyone or has no potential for abuse. Humans abuse everything from laxatives to alcohol to prescription drugs. I would also be irresponsible to suggest using Cannabis to anyone. Different states have different laws, and while 21 states have enacted medical marijuana laws, the U.S. Government still deems Cannabis a dangerous drug with NO medicinal use. The Federal Government classifies Cannabis as a Schedule 1 drug, which puts it in the same class as Heroin.

Image courtesy of www.cureyourowncancer.org
Image courtesy of http://www.cureyourowncancer.org This is a real picture of real results. Visit the website http://www.cureyourowncancer.org for more information.

This is simply an article presenting a history of the use of Cannabis in Humans throughout the centuries and also several videos of actual physician and patient testimonials. This article is intended to provide evidence and education on the anti-cancer properties of this complex plant known as Cannabis.

The following information was taken directly from http://www.cancer.gov.

Laboratory/Animal/Preclinical Studies

Anti-tumor Effects
Appetite Stimulation
Analgesia

Cannabinoids are a group of 21-carbon–containing terpenophenolic compounds produced uniquely byCannabis species (e.g., Cannabis sativa L.) .[1,2] These plant-derived compounds may be referred to as phytocannabinoids. Although delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient, other known compounds with biologic activity are cannabinol, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabichromene, cannabigerol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, and delta-8-THC. CBD, in particular, is thought to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity without the psychoactive effect (high) of delta-9-THC.

Anti-tumor Effects:

One study in mice and rats suggested that cannabinoids may have a protective effect against the development of certain types of tumors.[3] During this 2-year study, groups of mice and rats were given various doses of THC by gavage. A dose-related decrease in the incidence of hepatic adenoma tumors and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was observed in the mice. Decreased incidences of benign tumors(polyps and adenomas) in other organs (mammary glanduterus, pituitary, testis, and pancreas) were also noted in the rats. In another study, delta-9-THC, delta-8-THC, and cannabinol were found to inhibit the growth of Lewis lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo .[4] In addition, other tumors have been shown to be sensitive to cannabinoid-induced growth inhibition.[5-8]

Cannabinoids may cause anti-tumor effects by various mechanisms, including induction of cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis invasion and metastasis.[9-12] Two reviews summarize the molecular mechanisms of action of cannabinoids as anti-tumor agents.[13,14] Cannabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their non-transformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death. These compounds have been shown to induce apoptosis in gliomacells in culture and induce regression of glioma tumors in mice and rats. Cannabinoids protect normal glial cells of astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages from apoptosis mediated by the CB1 receptor.[15]

The effects of delta-9-THC and a synthetic agonist of the CB2 receptor were investigated in HCC.[16] Both agents reduced the viability of HCC cells in vitro and demonstrated anti-tumor effects in HCC subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The investigations documented that the anti-HCC effects are mediated by way of the CB2 receptor. Similar to findings in glioma cells, the cannabinoids were shown to trigger cell death through stimulation of an endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway that activates autophagy and promotes apoptosis. Other investigations have confirmed that CB1 and CB2 receptors may be potential targets in non-small cell lung carcinoma [17] and breast cancer.[18]

An in vitro study of the effect of CBD on programmed cell death in breast cancer cell lines found that CBD induced programmed cell death, independent of the CB1, CB2, or vanilloid receptors. CBD inhibited the survival of both estrogen receptor–positive and estrogen receptor–negative breast cancercell lines, inducing apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner while having little effect on non-tumorigenic, mammary cells.[19]

CBD has also been demonstrated to exert a chemopreventive effect in a mouse model of colon cancer.[20] In the experimental system, azoxymethane increased  premalignant and malignant lesions in the mouse colon. Animals treated with azoxymethane and CBD concurrently were protected from developing premalignant and malignant lesions. In in vitro experiments involving colorectal cancer cell lines, the investigators found that CBD protected DNA from oxidative damage, increased endocannabinoid levels, and reduced cell proliferation. In a subsequent study, the investigators found that the antiproliferative effect of CBD was counteracted by selective CB1 but not CB2 receptor antagonists, suggesting an involvement of CB1 receptors.[21]

Another investigation into the anti-tumor effects of CBD examined the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1).[12] ICAM-1 expression has been reported to be negatively correlated with cancermetastasis. In lung cancer cell lines, CBD upregulated ICAM-1, leading to decreased cancer cell invasiveness.

In an in vivo model using severe combined immunodeficient mice, subcutaneous tumors were generated by inoculating the animals with cells from human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines.[22] Tumor growth was inhibited by 60% in THC-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated control mice. Tumor specimens revealed that THC had antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects. However, research with immunocompetent murine tumor models has demonstrated immunosuppression and enhanced tumor growth in mice treated with THC.[23,24]

In addition, both plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids have been studied for anti-inflammatoryeffects. A mouse study demonstrated that endogenous cannabinoid system signaling is likely to provide intrinsic protection against colonic inflammation.[25] As a result, a hypothesis that phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoids may be useful in the risk reduction and treatment of colorectal cancer has been developed.[26-29]

CBD may also enhance uptake of cytotoxic drugs into malignant cells. Activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 2 (TRPV2) has been shown to inhibit proliferation of human glioblastoma multiforme cells and overcome resistance to the chemotherapy agent carmustine.[30] In an in vitro model, CBD increased TRPV2 activation and increased uptake of cytotoxic drugs, leading to apoptosis of glioma cells without affecting normal human astrocytes. This suggests that coadministration of CBD with cytotoxic agents may increase drug uptake and potentiate cell death in human glioma cells.

Many animal studies have previously demonstrated that delta-9-THC and other cannabinoids have a stimulatory effect on appetite and increase food intake. It is believed that the endogenous cannabinoid system may serve as a regulator of feeding behavior. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide potently enhances appetite in mice.[31] Moreover, CB1 receptors in the hypothalamus may be involved in the motivational or reward aspects of eating.[32]

Analgesia

Understanding the mechanism of cannabinoid-induced analgesia has been increased through the study of cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, and synthetic agonists and antagonists. The CB1 receptor is found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral nerve terminals. Similar toopioid receptors, increased levels of the CB1 receptor are found in regions of the brain that regulate nociceptive processing.[33] CB2 receptors, located predominantly in peripheral tissue, exist at very low levels in the CNS. With the development of receptor-specific antagonists, additional information about the roles of the receptors and endogenous cannabinoids in the modulation of pain has been obtained.[34,35]

Cannabinoids may also contribute to pain modulation through an anti-inflammatory mechanism; a CB2 effect with cannabinoids acting on mast cell receptors to attenuate the release of inflammatory agents, such as histamine and serotonin, and on keratinocytes to enhance the release of analgesic opioids has been described.[36-38] One study reported that the efficacy of synthetic CB1- and CB2-receptor agonists were comparable with the efficacy of morphine in a murine model of tumor pain.[39]

HELP END THE PROHIBITION OF CANNABIS! SIGN THE PETITION BELOW BY CLICKING ON THE IMAGE.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/decriminalize-marijuana-16
Please click and sign our petition to decriminalize a medicinal plant, cannabis and allow patients safe access to a medicine that has been used for more than 5000 years by humans. THE SCIENCE IS IN. THIS PLANT CURES AND PREVENTS CANCER. THIS PLANT TREATS MANY SERIOUS MEDICAL CONDITIONS. IT’S THE 21ST CENTURY. TIME FOR COMMON SENSE AND DRUG LAW REFORM.

References

  1. Adams IB, Martin BR: Cannabis: pharmacology and toxicology in animals and humans. Addiction 91 (11): 1585-614, 1996.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  2. Grotenhermen F, Russo E, eds.: Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutic Potential. Binghamton, NY: The Haworth Press, 2002.
  3.  National Toxicology Program .: NTP toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of 1-trans-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CAS No. 1972-08-3) in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice (gavage studies). Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser 446 (): 1-317, 1996.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  4. Bifulco M, Laezza C, Pisanti S, et al.: Cannabinoids and cancer: pros and cons of an antitumour strategy. Br J Pharmacol 148 (2): 123-35, 2006.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  5. Sánchez C, de Ceballos ML, Gomez del Pulgar T, et al.: Inhibition of glioma growth in vivo by selective activation of the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor. Cancer Res 61 (15): 5784-9, 2001. [PUBMED Abstract]
  6. McKallip RJ, Lombard C, Fisher M, et al.: Targeting CB2 cannabinoid receptors as a novel therapy to treat malignant lymphoblastic disease. Blood 100 (2): 627-34, 2002.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  7. Casanova ML, Blázquez C, Martínez-Palacio J, et al.: Inhibition of skin tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo by activation of cannabinoid receptors. J Clin Invest 111 (1): 43-50, 2003. [PUBMED Abstract]
  8. Blázquez C, González-Feria L, Alvarez L, et al.: Cannabinoids inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in gliomas. Cancer Res 64 (16): 5617-23, 2004.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  9. Guzmán M: Cannabinoids: potential anticancer agents. Nat Rev Cancer 3 (10): 745-55, 2003. [PUBMED Abstract]
  10. Blázquez C, Casanova ML, Planas A, et al.: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by cannabinoids. FASEB J 17 (3): 529-31, 2003.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  11. Vaccani A, Massi P, Colombo A, et al.: Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism. Br J Pharmacol 144 (8): 1032-6, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  12. Ramer R, Bublitz K, Freimuth N, et al.: Cannabidiol inhibits lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis via intercellular adhesion molecule-1. FASEB J 26 (4): 1535-48, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  13. Velasco G, Sánchez C, Guzmán M: Towards the use of cannabinoids as antitumour agents. Nat Rev Cancer 12 (6): 436-44, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  14. Cridge BJ, Rosengren RJ: Critical appraisal of the potential use of cannabinoids in cancer management. Cancer Manag Res 5: 301-13, 2013.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  15. Torres S, Lorente M, Rodríguez-Fornés F, et al.: A combined preclinical therapy of cannabinoids and temozolomide against glioma. Mol Cancer Ther 10 (1): 90-103, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  16. Vara D, Salazar M, Olea-Herrero N, et al.: Anti-tumoral action of cannabinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma: role of AMPK-dependent activation of autophagy. Cell Death Differ 18 (7): 1099-111, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  17. Preet A, Qamri Z, Nasser MW, et al.: Cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as novel targets for inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer growth and metastasis. Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4 (1): 65-75, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  18. Nasser MW, Qamri Z, Deol YS, et al.: Crosstalk between chemokine receptor CXCR4 and cannabinoid receptor CB2 in modulating breast cancer growth and invasion. PLoS One 6 (9): e23901, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  19. Shrivastava A, Kuzontkoski PM, Groopman JE, et al.: Cannabidiol induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells by coordinating the cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy. Mol Cancer Ther 10 (7): 1161-72, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  20. Aviello G, Romano B, Borrelli F, et al.: Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer. J Mol Med (Berl) 90 (8): 925-34, 2012.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  21. Romano B, Borrelli F, Pagano E, et al.: Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol. Phytomedicine 21 (5): 631-9, 2014. [PUBMED Abstract]
  22. Preet A, Ganju RK, Groopman JE: Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration in vitro as well as its growth and metastasis in vivo. Oncogene 27 (3): 339-46, 2008.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  23. Zhu LX, Sharma S, Stolina M, et al.: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits antitumor immunity by a CB2 receptor-mediated, cytokine-dependent pathway. J Immunol 165 (1): 373-80, 2000. [PUBMED Abstract]
  24. McKallip RJ, Nagarkatti M, Nagarkatti PS: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances breast cancer growth and metastasis by suppression of the antitumor immune response. J Immunol 174 (6): 3281-9, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  25. Massa F, Marsicano G, Hermann H, et al.: The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation. J Clin Invest 113 (8): 1202-9, 2004.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  26. Patsos HA, Hicks DJ, Greenhough A, et al.: Cannabinoids and cancer: potential for colorectal cancer therapy. Biochem Soc Trans 33 (Pt 4): 712-4, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  27. Liu WM, Fowler DW, Dalgleish AG: Cannabis-derived substances in cancer therapy–an emerging anti-inflammatory role for the cannabinoids. Curr Clin Pharmacol 5 (4): 281-7, 2010. [PUBMED Abstract]
  28. Malfitano AM, Ciaglia E, Gangemi G, et al.: Update on the endocannabinoid system as an anticancer target. Expert Opin Ther Targets 15 (3): 297-308, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  29. Sarfaraz S, Adhami VM, Syed DN, et al.: Cannabinoids for cancer treatment: progress and promise. Cancer Res 68 (2): 339-42, 2008.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  30. Nabissi M, Morelli MB, Santoni M, et al.: Triggering of the TRPV2 channel by cannabidiol sensitizes glioblastoma cells to cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Carcinogenesis 34 (1): 48-57, 2013.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  31. Mechoulam R, Berry EM, Avraham Y, et al.: Endocannabinoids, feeding and suckling–from our perspective. Int J Obes (Lond) 30 (Suppl 1): S24-8, 2006.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  32. Fride E, Bregman T, Kirkham TC: Endocannabinoids and food intake: newborn suckling and appetite regulation in adulthood. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 230 (4): 225-34, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  33. Walker JM, Hohmann AG, Martin WJ, et al.: The neurobiology of cannabinoid analgesia. Life Sci 65 (6-7): 665-73, 1999.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  34. Meng ID, Manning BH, Martin WJ, et al.: An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids. Nature 395 (6700): 381-3, 1998.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  35. Walker JM, Huang SM, Strangman NM, et al.: Pain modulation by release of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96 (21): 12198-203, 1999.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  36. Facci L, Dal Toso R, Romanello S, et al.: Mast cells express a peripheral cannabinoid receptor with differential sensitivity to anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92 (8): 3376-80, 1995.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  37. Ibrahim MM, Porreca F, Lai J, et al.: CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation produces antinociception by stimulating peripheral release of endogenous opioids. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102 (8): 3093-8, 2005.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  38. Richardson JD, Kilo S, Hargreaves KM: Cannabinoids reduce hyperalgesia and inflammation via interaction with peripheral CB1 receptors. Pain 75 (1): 111-9, 1998.  [PUBMED Abstract]
  39. Khasabova IA, Gielissen J, Chandiramani A, et al.: CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists promote analgesia through synergy in a murine model of tumor pain. Behav Pharmacol 22 (5-6): 607-16, 2011.  [PUBMED Abstract]   

http://www.canablogna.com would like to thank http://www.cancer.gov for the scientific data provided.

Article written by Emery Myers RN, DON-CLTC

This article is not a substitute for medical advice. Any decisions medically, should be discussed with your primary care physician. If you live in a state where Cannabis is illegal, then these treatment options are not available for any person legally.
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Marijuana treats Crohn’s Disease, researchers conclude.

emery myers:

Medical Marijuana PUTs CROHN’S DISEASE INTO REMISSION WITHOUT DANGEROUS SIDE EFFECTS!

Originally posted on AlternativeMedicineFreedom:

Marijuana treats Crohn’s Disease, researchers conclude.

by David Down

s

Pot treats the painful, widespread Inflammatory Bowel Disease known as Crohn’s Disease, researchers say, and bigger studies need to be done to see just how useful marijuana is.

The journal Pharmacology published a new paper titled ‘Cannabis Finds Its Way into Treatment of Crohn’s Disease’ wherein researchers state that, “in agreement with the ancient use of cannabis in intestinal disturbances and one decade of animal research, cannabis was shown in a clinical trial to reduce symptoms in patients with Crohn’s disease.”

The 2014 paper endorses a groundbreaking, but small study in 2013 that showed that pot caused a “complete remission” of Crohn’s Disease with no side effects.

View original 156 more words

NIH Clinical Center more than 3 million square feet large. image courtesy of Google Images.

National Institute on Drug Abuse(NIH), answer question is marijuana a medicine? article from www.drugabuse.gov

This is completely unchanged from the NIH. This information is not biased one way or another, but it sure shows some real truths about medicinal value. Then it crushes a blow. This article will assist you in your decision about the war on a plant and users of this plant.

 

NIH Clinical Center more than 3 million square feet large. image courtesy of Google Images.
NIH Clinical Center more than 3 million square feet large. image courtesy of Google Images.

Revised April 2014

The marijuana plant contains several chemicals that may prove useful for treating a range of illnesses or symptoms, leading many people to argue that it should be made legally available for medical purposes. In fact, a growing number of states (20 as of March 2014) have legalized marijuana’s use for certain medical conditions.

The term “medical marijuana” is generally used to refer to the whole unprocessed marijuana plant or its crude extracts, which are not recognized or approved as medicine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). But scientific study of the active chemicals in marijuana, called cannabinoids, has led to the development of two FDA-approved medications already, and is leading to the development of new pharmaceuticals that harness the therapeutic benefits of cannabinoids while minimizing or eliminating the harmful side effects (including the “high”) produced by eating or smoking marijuana leaves.

Are “Medical” and “Street” Marijuana Different?

In principle, no. Most marijuana sold in dispensaries as medicine is the same quality and carries the same health risks as marijuana sold on the street.

However, given the therapeutic interest in cannabidiol (CBD) to treat certain conditions such as childhood epilepsy, strains with a higher than normal CBD:THC ratio have been specially bred and sold for medicinal purposes; these may be less desirable to recreational users because of their weaker psychoactive effects.

What Are Cannabinoids and How Might They Be Useful Medically?

Cannabinoids are a large family of chemicals related to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana’s main psychoactive (mind-altering) ingredient. Besides THC, the marijuana plant contains over 100 other cannabinoids. Scientists and manufacturers of “designer” drugs have also synthesized numerous cannabinoids in the laboratory (some of which are extremely potent and, when abused, have led to serious health consequences). The body also produces its own cannabinoid chemicals (called endocannabinoids), which play a role in regulating pleasure, memory, thinking, concentration, movement, coordination, sensory and time perception, appetite, and pain.

Currently the two main cannabinoids of interest therapeutically are THC and cannabidiol (CBD), found in varying ratios in the marijuana plant. THC stimulates appetite and reduces nausea (and there are already approved THC-based medications for these purposes), but it may also decrease pain, inflammation, and spasticity. CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that may also be useful in reducing pain and inflammation, controlling epileptic seizures, and possibly even treating psychosis and addictions.

Research funded by the NIH is actively investigating the possible therapeutic uses of THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids to treat autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation, pain, seizures, substance use disorders, and other psychiatric disorders.

Misperceptions of Safety

Growing acceptance of medical marijuana (and now its legalization for recreational use in two states) may be influencing how young people perceive the harm associated with marijuana use generally. Research shows that as high school seniors’ perception of marijuana’s risks goes down, their marijuana use goes up, and vice versa (see graph). Surveys show significant recent increases among 10th and 12th graders for daily, current, and past-year marijuana use.

High School Seniors’ Past-Year Marijuana Use and Perceived Risk of Marijuana Use, 1975–2010 - Research shows that as high school seniors’ perception of marijuana’s risks goes down, their marijuana use goes up, and vice versa

Source: University of Michigan, 2013 Monitoring the Future Study

What Medications Contain Cannabinoids?

An FDA-approved drug called Dronabinol (Marinol®) contains THC and is used to treat nausea caused by chemotherapy and wasting disease (extreme weight loss) caused by AIDS. Another FDA-approved drug called Nabilone (Cesamet®) contains a synthetic cannabinoid similar to THC and is used for the same purposes.

A drug called Sativex®, which contains approximately equal parts THC and CBD, is currently approved in the UK and several European countries to treat spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis (MS), and it is now in Phase III clinical trials in the U.S. to establish its effectiveness and safety in treating cancer pain.

Although it has not yet undergone clinical trials to establish its effectiveness and safety (necessary to obtain FDA approval), a CBD-based drug called Epidiolex™ has recently been created to treat certain forms of childhood epilepsy. Some parents of children with a severe form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome have reported success in using a high-CBD strain of marijuana to control seizures in their children.

Why Isn’t the Marijuana Plant an FDA-Approved Medicine?

The FDA requires carefully conducted studies in large numbers of patients (hundreds to thousands) to accurately assess the benefits and risks of a potential medication. Thus far, there have not been enough large-scale clinical trials showing that benefits of the marijuana plant (as opposed to specific cannabinoid constituents) outweigh its risks in patients with the symptoms it is meant to treat.

The known safety concerns of marijuana include impairment of short-term memory; altered judgment and decisionmaking; and mood effects, including severe anxiety (paranoia) or even psychosis (loss of touch with reality), especially following high-dose exposures. Marijuana also significantly reduces motor coordination and slows reaction time, which makes it very dangerous to use before driving a car. Additionally, although we do not yet know whether marijuana smoking contributes to lung cancer risk, it can cause or worsen other respiratory problems such as bronchitis or chronic cough.

Are People With Health Problems More Vulnerable to Marijuana’s Risks?

Regular medicinal use of marijuana is a relatively new phenomenon, and for that reason its effects on people who are weakened or vulnerable because of illness are still relatively unknown. It is possible that people suffering from diseases such as cancer or AIDS may be more vulnerable to the drug’s various adverse effects. More research will be needed to determine if this is the case.

Growing evidence is showing that marijuana may be particularly harmful for young people: It may cause long-term or even permanent impairment in cognitive ability and intelligence when used regularly during adolescence, when the brain is still developing. There is also some evidence that marijuana use during pregnancy may be associated with neurological problems in babies and impaired school performance later in childhood.

Another safety concern is that, contrary to common belief, marijuana can be addictive: About 9% of people who try marijuana will become addicted to it. The number goes up to about 1 in 6 among people who start using marijuana as teenagers, and to 25-50% among daily users.

Original source article and images courtesy of: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana-medicine

Coffee good for Type 2 Diabetes?

Increasing consumption of coffee associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, study finds

The authors examined the associations between 4-year changes in coffee and tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in the subsequent 4 years.
Credit: © volff / Fotolia

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that increasing coffee consumption by on average one and half cups per day (approx 360ml) over a four-year period reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes by 11%. The research is led by Dr Frank Hu and Dr Shilpa Bhupathiraju, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA, and colleagues.

Coffee and tea consumption has been associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk but little is known about how changes in coffee and tea consumption influence subsequent type 2 diabetes risk. The authors examined the associations between 4-year changes in coffee and tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in the subsequent 4 years.

The authors used observational data from three large prospective, US-based studies in their analysis: the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) (female nurses aged 30-55 years, 1986-2006), the NHS II (younger female nurses aged 25-42 years 1991-2007), and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) (male professionals 40-75 years, 1986-2006). Detailed information on diet, lifestyle, medical conditions, and other chronic diseases was collected every 2 to 4 years for over 20 years.

The availability of these repeated measures and the long-duration of follow-up allowed the authors to evaluate 4 year changes in coffee and tea intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in the following 4 years. They also examined whether the association with diabetes incidence differed between changes in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Diet was assessed every 4 years using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Self-reported incident type 2 diabetes cases were validated by supplementary questionnaires. The final analysis included 48,464 women in NHS, 47,510 women in the NHS II, and 27,759 men in HPFS.

The authors documented 7,269 incident type 2 diabetes cases, and found that participants who increased their coffee consumption by more than 1 cup/day (median change=1.69 cups/day) over a 4-year period had a 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the subsequent 4-years compared to those who made no changes in consumption. Participants who decreased their coffee intake by 1 cup a day or more (median change=-2 cups/day) had a 17% higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Changes in tea consumption were not associated with type 2 diabetes risk.

Those with highest coffee consumption and who maintained that consumption — referred to as “high-stable consumers” since they consumed 3 cups or more per day — had the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes, 37% lower than the “low-stable consumers” who consumed 1 cup or less per day.

The authors say that the higher risk of type 2 diabetes associated with decreasing coffee intake may represent a true change in risk, or may potentially be due to reverse causation whereby those with medical conditions associated with risk for type 2 diabetes (such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, cancer) may reduce their coffee consumption after diagnosis. However, even when cases of cardiovascular disease or cancer were excluded during follow-up, the results were very similar.

Coffee good for Type 2 Diabetes?
Coffee good for Type 2 Diabetes? It appears it may reduce risks. Image courtesy of Google Images.

While baseline decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk, the changes in decaffeinated coffee consumption did not change this risk. Regarding tea consumption, the authors say: “we found no evidence of an association between 4-year increases in tea consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. This finding may have potentially been due to the relatively low number of participants who made significant changes to their tea consumption over a 4-year period thereby limiting statistical power to detect true associations. The overall low levels of tea consumption in this group may also be responsible for these findings.”

The authors say: “In these 3 large prospective cohorts with more than 1.6 million person-years of follow-up, we observed that increasing coffee, but not tea, intake over a 4-year period was associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk in the next 4 years. Decreasing coffee intake was associated with a higher type 2 diabetes risk. These changes in risk were observed for caffeinated, but not decaffeinated coffee, and were independent of initial coffee consumption and 4-year changes in other dietary and lifestyle factors.”

They add: “Changes in coffee consumption habits appear to affect diabetes risk in a relatively short amount of time. Our findings confirm those of prospective studies that higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk and provide novel evidence that changes in coffee consumption habits are related to diabetes risk.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DiabetologiaNote: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Shilpa Bhupathiraju et al. Changes in coffee intake and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes: three large cohorts of US men and womenDiabetologia, April 2014 DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3235-7
China Ancient Script

China Discovers Some Of The World’s Oldest Writing

BEIJING — Archaeologists say they have discovered some of the world’s oldest known primitive writing, dating back about 5,000 years, in eastern China, and some of the markings etched on broken axes resemble a modern Chinese character.

The inscriptions on artifacts found at a relic site south of Shanghai are about 1,400 years older than the oldest written Chinese language. Chinese scholars are divided over whether the markings are words or something simpler, but they say the finding will shed light on the origins of Chinese language and culture.

The oldest writing in the world is believed to be from Mesopotamia, dating back slightly more than 5,000 years. Chinese characters are believed to have been developed independently.

Inscriptions were found on more than 200 pieces dug out from the Neolithic-era Liangzhu relic site. The pieces are among thousands of fragments of ceramic, stone, jade, wood, ivory and bone excavated from the site between 2003 and 2006, lead archaeologist Xu Xinmin said.

The inscriptions have not been reviewed by experts outside the country, but a group of Chinese scholars on archaeology and ancient writing met last weekend in Zhejiang province to discuss the finding.

They agreed that the inscriptions are not enough to indicate a developed writing system, but Xu said they include evidence of words on two broken stone-ax pieces.

One of the pieces has six word-like shapes strung together to resemble a short sentence.

“They are different from the symbols we have seen in the past on artifacts,” Xu said. “The shapes and the fact that they are in a sentence-like pattern indicate they are expressions of some meaning.”

The six characters are arranged in a line, and three of them resemble the modern Chinese character for human beings. Each shape has two to five strokes.

“If five to six of them are strung together like a sentence, they are no longer symbols but words,” said Cao Jinyan, a scholar on ancient writing at Hangzhou-based Zhejiang University. He said the markings should be considered hieroglyphics.

He said there are also stand-alone shapes with more strokes. “If you look at the composition, you will see they are more than symbols,” Cao said.

But archaeologist Liu Zhao from Shanghai-based Fudan University warned that there was not sufficient material for any conclusion.

“I don’t think they should be considered writing by the strictest definition,” Liu said. “We do not have enough material to pin down the stage of those markings in the history of ancient writings.”

For now, the Chinese scholars have agreed to call it primitive writing, a vague term that suggests the Liangzhu markings are somewhere between symbols and words.

The oldest known Chinese writing has been found on animal bones – known as oracle bones – dating to 3,600 years ago during the Shang dynasty.

Original article at: CLICK HERE!

Featured Image -- 2758

What Does Freedom of Speech Mean?

emery myers:

Our first amendment! Every blogger needs to read this. It’s short but you need to know the 1st amendment! Freedom of speech…please, for your own protection. read this and use the 1st amendment! Many have died in unjust wars because they felt they were defending our constitution. I know this because I am a veteran of the USMC and I know what the realities of war are.

Originally posted on WWW.DarwinsRightLeftWing.com:

What exactly does Freedom of Speech Mean to Americans?

First Amendment to the Constitution. Image courtesy of Google Images
First Amendment to the Constitution. Image courtesy of Google Images

Among other cherished values, the First Amendment protects freedom of speech. The U.S. Supreme Court often has struggled to determine what exactly constitutes protected speech.

Congress Shall Make NO LAW...First Amendment of the Constitution. Image Crtsy Google Img
Congress Shall Make NO LAW…First Amendment of the Constitution. Image Crtsy Google Img

 The First Amendment states, in relevant part, that:

“Congress shall make no law…abridging freedom of speech.”

Freedom of Speech is our right as Americans. Never forget all of the sacrifice our ancestors bled…for our FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS! We have the right to free speech and that is a wonderful freedom to often taken for granted or stifled by other Americans.

Our First Amendment Rights Have Been Paid for by American sacrifice
Our First Amendment Rights Have Been Paid for by American sacrifice. Our country’s finest men and women have paid with their military service. Image courtesy of Google Images.

For this Amendment, I am…

View original 51 more words

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